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I am trying to synthesize two strings in Objective C so the setter/getter is automatically created.

In my implementation:

#import "Song.h"

@implementation Song

@synthesize song, track;

@end

In my interface:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Song : NSObject

@property string song, track;

@end

The error I am getting in my interface file is "Unknown type name string".

The error I am getting in my implementation file is "Expected a property name in @synthesize".

I am unsure what to do because I did this for int and it works.

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@property NSString *song, *track; –  Akshat Singhal Feb 20 '14 at 16:56
6  
Given your apparent newness to Objective-C, may I suggest you take some time to work with some good Objective-C tutorials or a good book. Learn the basics first. It will save you a lot of time later. –  rmaddy Feb 20 '14 at 17:04
    

5 Answers 5

There are several problems in your code:

  • Cocoa does not have a type called string, you need to use NSString instead
  • As of Xcode 4.4 you do not need to use @synthesize.

Here is how:

@interface Song : NSObject
// Below I am using copy to avoid referencing potentially mutable strings.
// You may or may not want to use this approach.
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *song;
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *track;

@end
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@matsoftware you don't need either. strong, readwrite and atomic are the default. –  Pranav Feb 20 '14 at 17:01

Synthesizing is done automatically in XCode 4.4 and later.

Your actual issue, though, is the declaration of the string properties.

in your header try

@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString *song;
@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString *track;

You can then reference those properties using

self.song

or access the property directly using

_song

Please note the second method is NOT recommended unless you're accessing the instance of the property within the setter or getter

The reason why it worked for int is because int is a primitive (and objective-c is a superset of C). An NSString is an NSObject in Objective-C and you must hold a strong or weak reference to it (you must point to it). You can read Apple's reference on encapsulating data for more information on properties.

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@property(nonatomic,strong) NSString *song;
@property(nonatomic,strong) NSString *track;
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NSString properties (or any of the classes with mutable/immutable types) should really use copy instead of strong. –  Abizern Mar 7 '14 at 14:29

In implementation:

#import "Song.h"

@implementation Song

@synthesize song, track;

@end

In interface:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Song : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, strong)NSString *song;
@property (nonatomic, strong)NSString *track;

@end
share|improve this answer

@synthesize is no longer required. Also, your declarations are incorrect. I would suggest reading Apple's documentation about objective-c syntax found here.

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