Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following C# code using a COM object.


MyComObject o = new MyComObject;
try
{
 var baz = o.Foo.Bar.Baz;
 try
 { 
  // do something with baz
 }
 finally
 {
  Marshal.ReleaseComObject(baz);
 }
}
finally
{
 Marshal.ReleaseComObject(o);
}

This will release the COM objects o and baz, but not the temporary objects returnd by o.Foo and o.Foo.Bar. This can cause problems, when those objects hold a large amount of unmanaged memory or other resources.

An obvious but ugly solution would be, to clutter the code even more with try-finally and Marshal.ReleaseComObject. See C# + COM Interop, deterministic release

As a workaround, I created a helper class


class TemporaryComObjects: IDisposable
{
 public C T<C>(C comObject)
 {
  m_objects.Add(comObject);
  return comObject;
 }
 public void Dispose()
 {
  foreach (object o in m_objects)
   Marshal.ReleaseComObject(o);
 }
}

Usage:


using (TemporaryComObjects t = new TemporaryComObjects())
{
 MyComObject o = t.T(new MyComObject);
 var baz = t.T(t.T(t.T(o.Foo).Bar).Baz);
 // do something with baz
}

My questions: Are there potential problems with this code? Has anybody a more elegant solution?

share|improve this question
    
(added an example using the expression tree approach) –  Marc Gravell Feb 3 '10 at 12:00
1  
@downvoter: please leave a comment –  Henrik Dec 8 '10 at 7:51
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

My biggest gripe would be the name, T; Add might be more illusrative of the usage. I'd also add where T : class to the generic method, but the "fluent API" seems usable. I'd also be inclined to flatten the code a bit. I can also see some ways of using the Expression API to walk an entire tree and capture all the intermediate steps, but it wouldn't be trivial - but imagine:

using(var com = new SomeWrapper()) {
    var baz = com.Add(() => new MyComObject().Foo.Bar.Baz);
}

where that is an expression tree and we get the intermediaries automatically.

(also, you could Clear() or null the list in Dispose())


Like so:

static class ComExample {
    static void Main()
    {
        using (var wrapper = new ReleaseWrapper())
        {
            var baz = wrapper.Add(
                () => new Foo().Bar.Baz);
            Console.WriteLine(baz.Name);
        }
    }
}

class ReleaseWrapper : IDisposable
{
    List<object> objects = new List<object>();
    public T Add<T>(Expression<Func<T>> func)
    {
        return (T)Walk(func.Body);
    }
    object Walk(Expression expr)
    {
        object obj = WalkImpl(expr);
        if (obj != null && Marshal.IsComObject(obj) && !objects.Contains(obj)) 
        {
            objects.Add(obj);
        }
        return obj;
    }
    object[] Walk(IEnumerable<Expression> args)
    {
        if (args == null) return null;
        return args.Select(arg => Walk(arg)).ToArray();
    }
    object WalkImpl(Expression expr)
    {
        switch (expr.NodeType)
        {
            case ExpressionType.Constant:
                return ((ConstantExpression)expr).Value;
            case ExpressionType.New:
                NewExpression ne = (NewExpression)expr;
                return ne.Constructor.Invoke(Walk(ne.Arguments));
            case ExpressionType.MemberAccess:
                MemberExpression me = (MemberExpression)expr;
                object target = Walk(me.Expression);
                switch (me.Member.MemberType)
                {
                    case MemberTypes.Field:
                        return ((FieldInfo)me.Member).GetValue(target);
                    case MemberTypes.Property:
                        return ((PropertyInfo)me.Member).GetValue(target, null);
                    default:
                        throw new NotSupportedException();

                }
            case ExpressionType.Call:
                MethodCallExpression mce = (MethodCallExpression)expr;
                return mce.Method.Invoke(Walk(mce.Object), Walk(mce.Arguments));
            default:
                throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        foreach(object obj in objects) {
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(obj);
            Debug.WriteLine("Released: " + obj);
        }
        objects.Clear();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thank you very much for this detailed answer. I will definitely try it. –  Henrik Feb 3 '10 at 12:13
    
@Henrik - updated to add method call support –  Marc Gravell Feb 3 '10 at 12:30
    
Thanks, it works. I changed your code slightly to not release fields. These will be released in the Dispose method of the containing object. E.g. var bar = com.Add(() => this.m_foo.Bar); should not release m_foo. –  Henrik Feb 3 '10 at 14:01
1  
We use this for quite some time now and it works well except for a performance problem when many objects are added. This was solved by changing the List to a HashSet. –  Henrik Dec 1 '10 at 16:02
add comment

The solution of Marc Gravell won't work with .Net 4.+ because of introduction of Dynamic in COM instead of object. Furthermore, when testing with the Excel COM, there is an exception with the constructor saying "Convert not supported" (default of the switch of WalkImpl).

There are others limitations with Expressions as no indexed properties and no optional arguments. Never coded Expression before then I have no idea how to address these problems.

Won't compile or execute:

using (var wrapper = new ComWrapper())
  {
    var application = wrapper.Add(() => new Excel.Application());
    var workbook = wrapper.Add(() => application.Workbooks.Open(@"C:\MyExcel.xls"));

    Excel.Range range = wrapper.Add(() => workbook.Sheets[1].UsedRange);
    string value = wrapper.Add(() => range.Cells[1, 1]).Value2;
  }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.