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Is there any testing category(or categories) exists under which all testing types falls? Is it true that white box testing & black box testing include different types of testing. Are all the testing types fall under this two categories? Can we differentiate different testing types based on a specific thing?

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There are many types of testing. Here is an un-exhaustive list:

  • Regression testing - making sure existing functionality doesn't break
  • Feature testing - testing new functionality
  • Performance testing - testing product under load
  • Usability testing - make sure the product is user friendly
  • Unit testing - testing the product at a component/module/function level
  • Integration testing - testing the individual components combined together
  • End-to-end testing - testing the product as a whole
  • Real world testing - testing the product in real world type scenarios
  • Manual testing - testing performed by humans
  • Automated testing - testing performed by machines

These involve white box and/or black box testing. Some of these you could do either way. Some of these testing types are done together (e.g. automated integration testing). The category that all types of testing fall into is 'testing'. You differentiate the different testing types by purpose, semantics, and implementation.

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@Jeremy Raymond: Fantastic list. Don't forget acceptance testing! –  Jason Feb 5 '10 at 1:10
    
@Jason Do you consider functional testing, end-to-end testing and acceptance testing as different things? –  Pascal Thivent Feb 5 '10 at 1:28
    
@Pascal - many of these testing types aren't mutually exclusive. –  Jeremy Raymond Feb 5 '10 at 12:07

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