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I am using jQuery.validate to validate a searchbox. I am putting the error messages inside the input box. The trouble is if you click submit once, the error message displays as it should. But if you click it twice it then uses the error message as the search term.

I need it to ignore this error message and not submit it as the search query.

<input class="search-input required" id="search" type="search" name="s" placeholder="Search">
<input type="hidden" id="post_type" class="required" name="post_type" value="wpdmcategory" />

$("#documents-searchform").validate({
onkeyup: false,
onblur: false,
focusInvalid: false,
ignoreTitle: true,

    messages: {
    s: "Enter a search term"
}, 
errorPlacement: function(error, element) {
    element.val(error.text());
}
});
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your approach makes no sense. Why would you want the error message to be the value of the field? Then you have the error itself becoming the form data and creating a new error. This would make for a really unpleasant user experience.

What if you use the placeholder attribute instead?

errorPlacement: function (error, element) {
    element.prop('placeholder', error.text());
}

It's not ideal but at least you're not messing up the field value with the error text.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/Rw9JH

share|improve this answer
    
Not my choice - client is insisting on it!! Thanks though worked a treat. – user1683285 Feb 21 '14 at 0:35

I don't think it's a good idea to turn the error message into the new value of your field, as it will lead exactly to the behaviour you are facing, with no clean workaround I can think of in this situation.

However, the best solution I can think of is not placing the error message as the field value, but positioning it as a fixed element relative to the input field.

errorPlacement: function(error, element) {
    error.insertAfter(element).position({
          my:'left top',
          at:'left top',
          of: element          
    });
}

It may not be 100% well positioned but I do believe that this is better than changing the field value.

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