Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the process of building a database storage for my app consisting on a single table with a huge data volume (hundreds of millions of records). I'm planning on having an index on the date field, since I'll be doing a batch recovery of all the records in a given period of time every now and then (for example, retrieving all records for the following day, at midnight).

Since the number of records is huge and performance is an important concern in this system, I would like to know if there is a way I can dynamically partition my table so that I can retrieve the records faster, creating and truncating partitions as they are no longer needed. For example, how would I go about creating a partition for the following day and populating it with the rest of the data after I'm done processing today's records?

Thanks in advance! =)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

In 11g we can define INTERVAL partitions, and Oracle will automatically create new partitions when it gets new records whose keys don't fit in any of the existing ranges. This is a very cool feature. Find out more.

One thing to bear in mind is that Partitioning is a chargeable extra on top of the Enterprise Edition license. So it is not cheap to use.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 The introduction of INTERVAL partitioning eliminates most of the need for the home-grown solutions to automatically manage the addition of partitions. The only enhancement I wish Oracle would provide is some way to define a format mask for the generated partition names - they now are generated with generic system-generated names and I'm always having to look at the LONG column HIGH_VALUE in x_tab_partitions for meaningful information about the interval. –  dpbradley Feb 3 '10 at 14:28
    
@dpbradley - I have not had teh good fortunate to actually use Partitioning in 11g for real, but I can see that would get quite annoying. –  APC Feb 3 '10 at 15:16
    
Just a warning, you can't mix Referential partitioning with Interval partitioning. We opted to use referential partitioning and then hand roll a job to create the monthly partitions with our preferred naming convention. –  PenFold Feb 3 '10 at 16:42
    
@dpbradley, your link it broken –  Nathan Feger Jan 27 '11 at 15:15
    
Although interval partitioning is a great step in the right direction, it has some major flaws depending on what you are doing. The main ones for me are the difficulty in dropping old partitions and the limit on the number of potential partitions you can have. –  Burhan Ali Sep 8 '13 at 9:10

you can automate the process of creating or truncating partitions through the use of dynamic SQL. You would write procedures with either EXECUTE IMMEDIATE or DBMS_SQL and you would schedule them with DBMS_JOB or DBMS_SCHEDULER (DBMS_SCHEDULER is a 10g feature and is more versatile than DBMS_JOB).

You probably want to build the partition statements manually first and automate the process later when you are confident with the DDL. You will find all the synthax in the documentation for the ALTER TABLE statement.

share|improve this answer

Here is a sample of something I came up with for creating partitions using SYSDATE and an offset. I had to create replacement parameters with a string concatenated to the SYSDATE:

COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_name_01;
SELECT 'TABLE_NAME_' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 3, 'YYYYMMDD') AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_date_01;
SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 3, 'SYYYY-MM-DD') || ' 00:00:00' AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_name_02;
SELECT 'TABLE_NAME_' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 2, 'YYYYMMDD') AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_date_02;
SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 2, 'SYYYY-MM-DD') || ' 00:00:00' AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_name_03;
SELECT 'TABLE_NAME_' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 1, 'YYYYMMDD') AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_date_03;
SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE - 1, 'SYYYY-MM-DD') || ' 00:00:00' AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_name_04;
SELECT 'TABLE_NAME_' || TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, 'YYYYMMDD') AS temp_var FROM dual;
COLUMN temp_var new_value partition_date_04;
SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, 'SYYYY-MM-DD') || ' 00:00:00' AS temp_var FROM dual;
CREATE TABLE TABLE_NAME
(
   SEQ_NO                 NUMBER NOT NULL,
   INSERT_DATE            DATE NOT NULL,
   FIRST_NAME             VARCHAR2 (256 BYTE),
   LAST_NAME              VARCHAR2 (256 BYTE),
   ID_NUM                 NUMBER,
   ID_STATUS              NUMBER
)

PARTITION BY RANGE
   (INSERT_DATE)
   SUBPARTITION BY LIST
      (ID_STATUS)
      SUBPARTITION TEMPLATE (
         SUBPARTITION SP1 VALUES (0) TABLESPACE &tblspce,
         SUBPARTITION SP2 VALUES (1) TABLESPACE &tblspce,
         SUBPARTITION SP3 VALUES (2) TABLESPACE &tblspce)

   (
   PARTITION &partition_name_01
      VALUES LESS THAN
      (TO_DATE ('&partition_date_01',
                   'SYYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS',
                   'NLS_CALENDAR=GREGORIAN')),

   PARTITION &partition_name_02
      VALUES LESS THAN
      (TO_DATE ('&partition_date_02',
                   'SYYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS',
                   'NLS_CALENDAR=GREGORIAN')),

   PARTITION &partition_name_03
      VALUES LESS THAN
      (TO_DATE ('&partition_date_03',
                   'SYYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS',
                   'NLS_CALENDAR=GREGORIAN')),
sysdate

   PARTITION &partition_name_04
      VALUES LESS THAN
      (TO_DATE ('&partition_date_04',
                   'SYYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS',
                   'NLS_CALENDAR=GREGORIAN')))

ENABLE ROW MOVEMENT;
share|improve this answer

There's a product that takes care of it automatically. PartitionManager for Oracle provides automatic partition management, based on the organization retention, including purging and archiving old data, statistics copy etc. You can try it out at http://www.xyrosoft.com

share|improve this answer
    
In what ways is this an improvement over what Oracle already provides? –  Burhan Ali Sep 8 '13 at 9:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.