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Getting up to speed on learning classes. I have been reading that the constructor (def init in Python) should only set assigned variables, that calculated instance attributes should be set via a property. Also, that using @property is preferred to a Java-style getter/setter.

OK, but every example I have ever seen on this sets only one property. Let's say I have an object with three complicated attributes that need to be calculated, queried etc. How do you represent multiple @property getters, setters, deleters? Here is an example from another post:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

So if I had three instance variables that were calculated values based on some other attributes, would it look like this

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

    @property
    def y(self):
        """I'm the 'y' property."""
        return self._y

    @y.setter
    def y(self, value):
        self._y = value

    @y.deleter
    def y(self):
        del self._y

    @property
    def z(self):
        """I'm the 'z' property."""
        return self._z

    @z.setter
    def z(self, value):
        self._z = value

    @z.deleter
    def z(self):
        del self._z

Or is that fact that I only ever see one @property statement mean that having a class with more than one @property is a bad idea?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, you can use multiple @property decorators to your heart's content. There is no limit here, other than that of example writers imaginations, apparently.

The Python standard library is full of @property use if you want examples:

  • numbers defines ABCs for the numbers classes in Python.

  • tempfile implements temporary file objects

  • threading provding higher-level thread support

  • urlparse for handling URLs and query strings.

etc.

You had it spot on; multiple properties would look exactly like what you posted.

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Thanks for everyone's help - I got lots of great feedback! –  Alan S Feb 20 '14 at 20:41

It may be ugly, but that is the way it works. In general, the pythonic recommendation is not to create simple setter/getters that directly access the native variable (unless you know the interface is likely to change). Assuming that the reason for the properties is 'complex calculations' as you said, there is no shortcut to the somewhat ugly looking pattern. See this link http://tomayko.com/writings/getters-setters-fuxors

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it's not a bad idea. it's a regular property pattern.

another pattern is doing like:

class A(object):

    def _get_a(self):
        return self._a

    def _set_a(self, v)
        self._a = v

    def _del_a(self)
        del self._a

    a = property(_get_a, _set_a, _del_a)

the result is the same that in the first example, and you can use it as much as you wish. initializing self._a in the constructor is a good idea, since otherwise, accesing it BEFORE by calling self.a would raise AttributeError

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Consider using just myObj.foo or myObj.foo() over myObj.set_foo(). People differ on this but there's consensus that the get_ is not generally helpful and just makes stuff look like Java. –  a p Feb 20 '14 at 20:35
    
Thanks I didn't think about initializing. So I would just say something like def __init__(self, a=None): self.a = a? –  Alan S Feb 20 '14 at 20:39
    
yes, that would be the same, and more encapsulated. –  Luis Masuelli Feb 21 '14 at 13:48
    
@ap i fixed my code (prepended underscore to deleter and setter). see that the methods are protected, and the only purpose for them is to be used as arguments to property() constructor, so they are not meant to be accesses publicly, and they are just an example to illustrate. I prefer the property-decorator pattern for getter, setter, and deleter. –  Luis Masuelli Feb 21 '14 at 13:52

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