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at our work place, we define a script queue in our site.master page

<script>
    // append functions to this array that will be executed after js dependencies have loaded
    var script_queue = [];
</script>

And then we push javascript functions to this script_queue to execute them. I am running into a problem, say I have 2 functions

<script type="text/javascript">
// THIS IS FUNCTION 1
       script_queue.push(function() {

           // set the width of the thumbnail list to the sum of all the li widths
           var thumbsWidth = 0;
           $('#oneClipPlaylist li').each(func
     …
}
</script>


  script_queue.push(function() {
     // THIS IS FUNCTION 2
        var allInputs = $('fieldset.categories input');
        var categoryInputs = $('fieldset.categories input').not('#categoryAll');
        var categoryAllInput = $('#categoryAll');

        allInputs.click(function() {

            var checkbox = $(this);

This is how the queue is processed:

<script> 
    (function () { 
        for (var i in script_queue) { 
            script_queue[i](); 
        } 
    } ());
</script>

How do I make sure that function 1 is executed before function 2? Because I am running into a problem that my function 2 executed before function 1 and the results are incorrect

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show the code that processes the queue? –  David Khaykin Feb 20 at 23:33
    
You can try async: github.com/caolan/async –  haywire Feb 20 at 23:39
    
Why not just use a callback to function 2 from the end of function 1, or a simple call to function 1 from the top of function 2 ? –  haywire Feb 20 at 23:43
    
Or define a function that calls the subfunctions 1 and 2 in the correct order and push that –  clancer Feb 20 at 23:44
    
@haywire what do you mean use a callback to function2 from the end of function 1? could you give me an example? –  doglin Feb 21 at 3:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Name the second function and don't queue it up, then call the second function at the end of the first function that is getting put in the queue.

<script type="text/javascript">
// THIS IS FUNCTION 1
       script_queue.push(function() {

           // set the width of the thumbnail list to the sum of all the li widths
           var thumbsWidth = 0;
           $('#oneClipPlaylist li').each(func
     …
    secondFunc();
}

function secondFunc() {
// THIS IS FUNCTION 2
        var allInputs = $('fieldset.categories input');
        var categoryInputs = $('fieldset.categories input').not('#categoryAll');
        var categoryAllInput = $('#categoryAll');

        allInputs.click(function() {

            var checkbox = $(this);

    ...
}
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
I did it this way and it worked fine –  doglin Feb 26 at 17:21

I've implemented a similar system to this a long time ago, at a job far, far away :) Our purpose was to load dependencies before other scripts that require those dependencies. For example if you are loading jQuery this way, any other script that uses jQuery must obviously execute only after jQuery has loaded. Same goes for any custom JS objects, etc.

Some considerations:

Your code will execute in proper order in the for loop. So, if that's not happening, it is due either to

  1. How you add functions to the queue. It's possible they are not added in the order you think. That would be one cause;

  2. Functions with Ajax callbacks or other async code such as loading external JS files dynamically. A function might execute and wait for a result, but while it's waiting, the other functions will execute in that for loop.

The first one is easy to check - just verify the order of the functions is as expected prior to processing them and see if it's in the right order, then check your application code to see why this is happening.

Most likely, though, it's due to #2 - async calls to load JS files and/or Ajax calls; ( To see an example of how/why it doesn't work in order, see the bottom of the answer )

One possible solution: A Script Loading Manager of sorts

Rather simple, we use this object to add scripts to the queue, with special consideration for Ajax. The scripts can all be dependent on nothing, or another script. When we process the queue, only scripts that don't have a dependency are immediately executed.

Then, when scripts finish, any dependent scripts are executed. The only special case is Ajax where only a minor change is needed, namely to add a context property to the settings object of any jQuery.ajax() calls, and register the global jQuery.ajaxComplete(). The value of the context property should be set to the script key (i.e., "Script0").

$jsload object:

<script type="text/javascript">

// Let's create global $jsload object to handle queueing of JS scripts
var $jsload = (function () {
    // Let's make the internals private
    var scriptQueue = {};
    var dependencies = {};
    var enqueue = function (key, scriptFunc, dependencyKey, isAjax) {
        scriptQueue[key] = {
            dependencyKey: dependencyKey,
            func: function () {
                scriptFunc();
                if (!isAjax) scriptCallBack(key);
            }
        };
        addDependencyItem(key, dependencyKey);
    }
    var addDependencyItem = function (key, dependencyKey) {
        if (null == dependencyKey) return;
        // Check to add to dependencies
        if (null == dependencies[dependencyKey] || 'undefined' == dependencies[dependencyKey])
            dependencies[dependencyKey] = {};

        // add this script to dependent scripts
        dependencies[dependencyKey][key] = { isCompleted: false };
    };
    var checkDependency = function (key, dependencyKey) {
        var obj = dependencies[scriptQueue[key].dependencyKey];
        if (null != obj && !obj.isCompleted)
            return false;
        return true;
    };
    var scriptCallBack = function (key) {
        // Called when a script has finished; now ok to process dependencies
        if (null != dependencies[key]) {
            for (var itemKey in dependencies[key]) {
                scriptQueue[itemKey].func();
                dependencies[key][itemKey].isCompleted = true;
            }
        }
    };

    // The jsLoaderWithDependency object executes dependent scripts in the correct order
    // The only callable public methods are queue, ajax, and processQueue
    var jsLoaderWithDependency = {
        queue: function (key, scriptFunc, dependencyKey) {
            enqueue(key, scriptFunc, dependencyKey, false)
        },
        ajax: function (key, scriptFunc, dependencyKey) {
            enqueue(key, scriptFunc, dependencyKey, true)
        },
        processQueue: function () {
            for (var key in scriptQueue) {
                if (checkDependency(key)) {
                    scriptQueue[key].func();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    // This handler will execute at end of all Ajax requests;
    // You can instead meake separate success/error handlers,
    // for example, not to execute dependency scripts on error 
    // yet still show a message and/or log the error, etc.
    $(document).ready(function () {
        $(document).ajaxComplete(function (event, xhr, settings) {
            scriptCallBack(settings.context);
        });
    });

    return jsLoaderWithDependency;
})(); // Auto-execute self and init

</script>

Some usage examples of how to queue up and execute functions:

<script type="text/javascript">

// Usage and test code
$jsload.ajax(
    "Script0",
    function () {
        $.ajax({
            // This is the only small change needed for dependency callback
            context: "Script0", 

            // Standard ajax settings
            url: "",
            data: "ho ho ho",
            dataType: "jsonp",
            jsonp: "jsonp",

            success: function (response, textS, xhr) {
                console.log("Script 0 ( Ajax ) (no dependency) success");
            },
            error: function (xmlHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                console.log("Script 0 ( Ajax ) (no dependency) error");
            }
        });
        console.log("Script 0 ( Ajax ) (no dependency) start");
    },
    null
);
$jsload.queue(
    "Script1",
    function () { console.log("Script 1 (dependency on Script 0, ajax callback)"); },
    "Script0"
);
$jsload.queue(
    "Script2",
    function () { console.log("Script 2 (depends on Script 3)"); },
    "Script3"
);
$jsload.queue(
    "Script3",
    function () { setTimeout(console.log("Script 3 Timeout (depends on Script 1)"), 1000); },
    "Script1"
);
$jsload.queue(
    "Script4",
    function () { console.log("Script 4 (no dependency)");},
    null
);

$jsload.processQueue();


</script>

And, the result:

enter image description here

This is really a basic start and surely it can be improved to handle dynamic script loading (using the loaded event) and other application needs. But I think it's a decent start for a framework for this type of functionality.


Example of the basic code without dependencies and some scenarios where it breaks:

Here's a simple example of the script processing in order, except the timeout and async call: // append functions to this array that will be executed after js dependencies have loaded var script_queue = [];

    // Adding basic functions to queue
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(1); });        
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(2); });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(3); });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(4); });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(5); });

    // Let's do some Ajax!
    script_queue.push(function () {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET", url: "http://otherdomain.com/somePage.html",
            data: "ho ho ho", dataType: "jsonp", jsonp: "jsonp",

            success: function (response, textS, xhr) {
                console.log("6 ajax finished success")
            },
            error: function (xmlHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                console.log("6 ajax finished error")
            }
        });
        console.log("6 ajax start");
    });
    // Let's throw in a timeout
    script_queue.push(function () {
        window.setTimeout(function () { console.log("7 with timeout") }, 1000);
    });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(8); });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(9); });
    script_queue.push(function () { console.log(10); });

    // Process the funcs
    (function () { 
        for (var i in script_queue) { 
            script_queue[i](); 
        } 
    } ());

</script>

And, the result from console:

enter image description here

As you can see, most of the functions executed in order - the Ajax one started in the correct order - but when the callback executed and the timeout finished, all of the other functions had already been processed.

The dependency manager is a way to solve this problem.

Hope this helps and gives you some ideas!


share|improve this answer
1  
thanks for sharing, looks like something that might come in handy so i've bookmarked. Though, I wonder if jQuery's .promise and/or .when callbacks could be used to make this better? I'm not sure; haven't really tried to play with those for something like this. –  Crayon Violent Feb 24 at 15:40
    
@CrayonViolent: That's interesting to me as well, will have a look at Promise() and Done(). As the saying goes, there's always a better way. :) –  David Khaykin Feb 24 at 15:46

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