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Using chrono I have been trying to implement a timer but I feel like I'm missing something. It is important for the function to be called on every iteration but some instructions will be executed only after a delay. This is a simplified example from a larger project. What am I missing?

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
using namespace std;
using namespace std::chrono;
const double delay = duration_cast<milliseconds>(seconds(5)).count();
double counter = 0.f;
void doit(const double time)
{
    if(counter < delay)
    {
        counter += time;
        std::cerr <<"NOT DOING IT:  "<<counter<<std::endl<<delay<<std::endl;
        return;
    }
    counter = 0.f;
    std::cerr <<"DOING IT"<<std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    duration<double,std::milli> timetaken;
    duration<double,std::milli> looptime;
    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    timetaken = end - start;
    auto loopstart = end;

    while(timetaken < std::chrono::seconds(10))
    {
        looptime = duration_cast<milliseconds>(loopstart - end);
        loopstart = end;

        doit(looptime.count());


        end = high_resolution_clock::now();
        timetaken = end - start;


    }
    std::cerr<<"TT:"<<duration_cast<seconds>(timetaken).count()<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

The output shows that the delay being passed is the delta time of the loop. The timetaken works properly though. Sample output: NOT DOING IT: 2971 3000 NOT DOING IT: 2971 3000 NOT DOING IT: 3145 3000 DOING IT

The trouble is that it only works when I print the "DOING iT" or "NOT DOING IT" lines so I'm guessing that the reolution of the timer isn't fine enough when I comment out the "NOT DOING IT" line as when I do that, there is no "DOING IT" output.

EDIT

Ok, so as is often the case writing a simplified version has pointed me in the right direction. As I alluded to it seems to be a resolution issue. By changing the units to nanoseconds it seems to be working as I'd expect. I'd still like to hear from anyone who doubts the general approach or has brighter ideas/references. Here's my working version:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
using namespace std;
using namespace std::chrono;
const double delay = duration_cast<nanoseconds>(seconds(2)).count();
double counter = 0.f;
void doit(const double time)
{
    if(counter < delay)
    {
        counter += time;
        //std::cerr <<"NOT DOING IT:  "<<counter<<std::endl<<delay<<std::endl;
        return;
    }
    counter = 0.f;
    std::cerr <<"DOING IT"<<std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    duration<double,std::nano> timetaken;
    duration<double,std::nano> looptime;
    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto end = high_resolution_clock::now();
    timetaken = end - start;
    auto loopstart = end;

    while(timetaken < std::chrono::seconds(10))
    {
        looptime = duration_cast<nanoseconds>(end - loopstart);
        loopstart = end;

        doit(looptime.count());


        end = high_resolution_clock::now();
        timetaken = end - start;


    }
    std::cerr<<"TT:"<<duration_cast<seconds>(timetaken).count()<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I think you wanted to check against the time given in the argument, not against delay.

if(counter < time)
{
    counter += delay;
    std::cerr <<"NOT DOING IT:  "<<counter<<std::endl<<delay<<std::endl;
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right but it wasn't my problem unfortunately. It was a mistake of transferring from the other code but thanks for the heads up, I've edited my original answer. I think I have the solution too. –  jacksawild Feb 21 at 0:35

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