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I'm working on code written by a previous developer and in a query it says,

WHERE p.name <=> NULL

What does <=> mean in this query? Is it something equal to =? Or is it a syntax error?

But it is not showing any errors or exceptions. I already know that <> = != in MySQL.

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13  
the spaceship operator –  Mhd.Tahawi Feb 25 at 20:13

9 Answers 9

up vote 146 down vote accepted

Similarity with = operator

Like the regular = operator, two values are compared and the result is either 0 (not equal) or 1 (equal); in other words: 'a' <=> 'b' yields 0 and 'a' <=> 'a' yields 1.

Difference with = operator

Unlike the regular = operator, values of NULL don't have a special meaning and so it never yields NULL as a possible outcome; so: 'a' <=> NULL yields 0 and NULL <=> NULL yields 1.

Contrary to =, whereby 'a' = NULL yields NULL and even NULL = NULL yields NULL; BTW, almost all operators and functions in MySQL work in this manner, because comparing against NULL is basically undefined.

Usefulness

This is very useful for when both operands may contain NULL and you need a consistent comparison result between two columns.

Another use-case is with prepared statements, for example:

... WHERE col_a <=> ? ...

Here, the placeholder can be either a scalar value or NULL without having to change anything about the query.

Related operators

Besides <=> there are also two other operators that can be used to compare against NULL, namely IS NULL and IS NOT NULL; they're part of the ANSI standard and therefore supported on other databases, unlike <=>, which is MySQL-specific.

You can think of them as specializations of MySQL's <=>:

'a' IS NULL     ==> 'a' <=> NULL
'a' IS NOT NULL ==> NOT('a' <=> NULL)

Based on this, your particular query (fragment) can be converted to the more portable:

WHERE p.name IS NULL
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2  
so it means there is no difference? and this <=> is somewhat a useless operator? right? –  zzlalani Feb 21 at 8:18
7  
@zzlalani Not at all; <=> takes two operands whereas IS (NOT) NULL only takes one; big difference ... it's as useful as = itself in that respect. –  Ja͢ck Feb 21 at 8:20
6  
@zzlalani IS NULL and IS NOT NULL are in the SQL standard. <=> is a MySQL specific extension. –  Daniel Dinnyes Feb 21 at 11:10
3  
So, like the is not distinct from operator. Curious to know if MySQL can use an index on that... –  Denis Feb 21 at 20:45
2  
I dont understand who downvoted this answer. As I think Jack put his best effort to explain it for us! –  Rahul Tripathi Mar 5 at 7:45

is <=> NULL-safe equal to operator

This operator performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.

See here for the documentation

Sample :

you should use IS NOT NULL. (The comparison operators = and <> both give UNKNOWN with NULL on either side of the expression.)

SELECT * 
FROM table 
WHERE YourColumn IS NOT NULL;

can also negate the null safe equality operator but this is not standard SQL.

SELECT *
FROM table 
WHERE NOT (YourColumn <=> NULL);
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It is the NULL-safe equal to operator

<=> Operator is used to compare NULL values with the fields. If normal =(equals) Operators return NULL if one of the comparison value is NULL. With <=> operator returns true or false. <=> Operator is same as IS NULL.

From the manual:-

<=> performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.

mysql> SELECT 1 <=> 1, NULL <=> NULL, 1 <=> NULL;
        -> 1, 1, 0
mysql> SELECT 1 = 1, NULL = NULL, 1 = NULL;
        -> 1, NULL, NULL

Edit:-(Although very late to add one important side note mentioning NOT <=> as well)

On a side note:-

NOT <=>

There is one more point NOT <=> which is used to compare NULL values with the fields. If normal != or <> (not equals) Operators return NULL if one of the comparison value is NULL. With NOT applied to <=> operator returns true or false. NOT applied to <=> Operator is same as IS NOT NULL.

Example:-

SELECT NULL != NULL,         //--Result is NULL
   NOT NULL <=> NULL,        //--Result is 0
   NULL IS NOT NULL;         //--Result is 0
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NOT <=> is not an operator, it's NOT applied to the result of op1 <=> op2. –  Ja͢ck Feb 26 at 4:25
    
@Jack:- Yes you are correct. Updated the answer! Added that so as to make a point :) –  Rahul Tripathi Feb 26 at 4:27
    
So I guess there's no <!=> operator –  Kip Feb 27 at 20:15
    
@kip: no there is not! –  Rahul Tripathi Feb 28 at 5:22
2  
@downvoter:- Why a downvote? –  Rahul Tripathi Mar 5 at 7:29

<=> is MySQL's null-safe "equal to" operator. From the manual:

NULL-safe equal. This operator performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.

mysql> SELECT 1 <=> 1, NULL <=> NULL, 1 <=> NULL;
        -> 1, 1, 0
mysql> SELECT 1 = 1, NULL = NULL, 1 = NULL;
        -> 1, NULL, NULL
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Refer to the manual entry for <=>:

NULL-safe equal. This operator performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.


 SELECT 1 <=> 1  -------------->result is 1
 SELECT NULL <=> NULL  -------->result is 1
 SELECT 1 <=> NULL  ----------->result is 0

 SELECT 1 = 1,  --------------->result is 1
 SELECT NULL = NULL  ---------->result is NULL
 SELECT 1 = NULL  ------------->result is NULL
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3  
So you downvoted everybody's answer to get attention? –  Rahul Tripathi Mar 5 at 7:30
    
@RahulTripathi what you are saying..I didn't do anythig.If you have any doubt you can check my profile vote casts..lol –  Nagaraj S Mar 5 at 7:34
    
@RahulTripathi Today my vote cast is 2..check here dear –  Nagaraj S Mar 5 at 7:35
1  
I am not blaming. I just checked all the answers here and all of them were downvoted except yours. Anyways if thats not you then no issues. May be some other person has targeted others except you. :) –  Rahul Tripathi Mar 5 at 7:37
2  
I won't jump to conclusions, but your edit being so close to the time of the downvotes is somewhat suspicious :) –  Ja͢ck Mar 5 at 7:54

NULL-safe equal. This operator performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.

mysql> SELECT 1 <=> 1, NULL <=> NULL, 1 <=> NULL;
        -> 1, 1, 0
mysql> SELECT 1 = 1, NULL = NULL, 1 = NULL;
        -> 1, NULL, NULL

It significance:

When you compare a NULL value with a non-NULL value, you'll get NULL. If you want to check if a value is null.

The Equality operator(<=>) which considers NULL as a normal value, so it returns 1 (not NULL) if both values are NULL and returns 0 (not NULL) if one of the values is NULL:

eg

 SELECT NULL <=> NULL -- 1
 SELECT TRUE <=> TRUE -- 1
 SELECT col1 <=> col2 FROM myTable
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<=> is the NULL-safe equal operator. a <=> b is same as writing:

CASE
    WHEN a IS NULL AND b IS NULL THEN 1 -- both operands null then 1
    WHEN a IS NULL OR  b IS NULL THEN 0 -- one operand is null then 0
    ELSE a = b                          -- else behave like normal = operator
END

And sorry, I could not find one good reason to use this operator instead of AND/OR IS (NOT) NULL. Your example for example, WHERE p.name <=> NULL is same as WHERE p.name IS NULL.

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From the MySQL documentation:

NULL-safe equal. This operator performs an equality comparison like the = operator, but returns 1 rather than NULL if both operands are NULL, and 0 rather than NULL if one operand is NULL.

An example using the <=> operator would be:

SELECT 1 <=> 1, NULL <=> NULL, 1 <=> NULL;

Which would return:

1, 1, 0

An example of the regular = operator would be:

SELECT 1 = 1, NULL = NULL, 1 = NULL;

Which would return:

1, NULL, NULL

The <=> operator is very similar to the = operator, except <=> will never return NULL

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It is the NULL - Safe Equal to operator. Check description.

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protected by Rahul Tripathi Feb 26 at 5:44

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