Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Write a program that exchanges the values of the bits on positions 3, 4 and 5 with bits on positions 24, 25 and 26 of a given 32-bit unsigned integer.

So above is the exercise and below are my workings.

int number = 28;                                //number                         -0001 1100    28
int bit3 = (number >> 3) & 1;                   //obtain bit 3rd bit from left   -0000 0001     1
int bit3return = bit3 << 3;                     //return bit to possition        -0000 1000     8
int numberReturn = number & (~(bit3return));    //number with bit place reversed -0001 0100    20

int number2 = 20;                               //number                         -0001 0100    20
int bit3Return = 1 << 3;                        //return bit to possition        -0000 1000     8
int numberReturn2 = number2 + bit3Return;       //number with bit place reversed -0001 0100    28

Here is my final code.

Console.WriteLine("Enter a number to be modified:");
int num = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

int b3 = (num >> 3) & 1;
int b4 = (num >> 4) & 1;
int b5 = (num >> 5) & 1;
int b24 = (num >> 24) & 1;
int b25 = (num >> 25) & 1;
int b26 = (num >> 26) & 1;

num = num & (~(1 << b24)) | (b3 << 24);
num = num & (~(1 << b3)) | (b24 << 3);
num = num & (~(1 << b25)) | (b4 << 25);
num = num & (~(1 << b4)) | (b25 << 4);
num = num & (~(1 << b26)) | (b5 << 26);
num = num & (~(1 << b5)) | (b26 << 5);

Console.WriteLine(num);

Problem is, it does not work:

I input 56 which is:

  • 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0011 1000

Output should be 117440512 which is:

  • 0000 0111 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

However I get 117440568 which is:

  • 0000 0111 0000 0000 0000 0000 0011 1000

If I input 117440512 I get the same output, so 0 becomes 1 but 1 does not become 0. Please help.

share|improve this question
2  
You added the new values but didn't remove the old ones? (XOR/OR) –  woutervs Feb 21 at 9:12
    
You might want to consider that you can extract all 3 low bits (or all 3 high bits) in a single operation. And that you don't necessarily have to shift them down into bit position 0. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 21 at 9:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For example with input x

x = 1234567890              // == 0100 1001 1001 0110 0000 0010 1101 0010

Get upper and lower mask

umask = 7 << 24             // == 0000 0111 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
lmask = 7 << 3              // == 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0011 1000

Get the bits that we want to swap

y = x & umask               // == 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
z = x & lmask               // == 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 0000

Shift y to the lower position

y = y >> (24 - 3)           // == 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000

Shift z to the higher position

z = z << (24 - 3)           // == 0000 0010 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

Mask out old values

x = x & ~( umask | lmask )  // == 0100 1000 1001 0110 0000 0010 1100 0010

Put in new values

x = x | y | z               // == 0100 1010 1001 0110 0000 0010 1100 1010
share|improve this answer

Your code is unnecessarily complicated. Think of manipulating with all three bits at the same time. The algorithm should be as follows:

  1. Separate bits 3, 4, 5 by masking with … 0011 1000;
  2. Shift left by 21 to positions 24, 25, 26;
  3. Separate bits 24, 25, 26 by masking with … 0111 0000 …;
  4. Shift right by 21 to positions 3, 4, 5;
  5. Mask-out 3, 4, 5, 24, 25, 26 in the original variable by ANDing with '…1000 1111 … 1100 01111';
  6. Mix-in the temporary results of (2) and (4) by ORing them to the results of (5).

Actual code implementation is left upon the reader.

share|improve this answer

Given:

int b24 = (num >> 24) & 1;

Means that b24 can only contain 0 or 1. Which means:

num & (~(1 << b24))

Will be clearing bit 0 or 1 of num. And then:

| (b3 << 24);

is either setting bit 24 (if b3 is 1) or is leaving it at whatever value it currently has (if b3 is 0). You probably wanted:

num & (~(1 << 24))

to clear bit 24 of the number.

(Apply same logic for all of the remaining lines. Each one repeatedly clears either bit 0 or 1 of num and then attempts to set a different bit's value)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.