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Thanks to Jake Vanderplas, I know how to start to code an animated plot with matplotlib. Here is a sample code:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import animation

fig = plt.figure()

ax = plt.axes(xlim=(0, 2), ylim=(0, 100))

line, = plt.plot([], [])

def init():
    line.set_data([], [])
    return line,

def animate(i):
    line.set_data([0, 2], [0,i])
    return line,

anim = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, init_func=init,
                               frames=100, interval=20, blit=True)

plt.show()

Suppose now I'd like to plot tons of functions (say four here), defined with the help of a loop. I did some voodoo programming, trying to understand how to mimic the comma following line and here is what I got (needless to say that it does not work: AttributeError: 'tuple' object has no attribute 'axes').

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import animation

fig = plt.figure()

ax = plt.axes(xlim=(0, 2), ylim=(0, 100))

line = []
N = 4

for j in range(N):
    temp, = plt.plot([], [])
    line.append(temp)

line = tuple(line)

def init():
    for j in range(N):
        line[j].set_data([], [])
    return line,

def animate(i):
    for j in range(N):
        line[j].set_data([0, 2], [10 * j,i])
    return line,

anim = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, init_func=init,
                               frames=100, interval=20, blit=True)

plt.show()

Some my question is: how can I make it work? Bonus (probably linked): what is the difference between line, = plt.plot([], []) and line = plt.plot([], [])?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First I will post you the solution, then some explanations:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import animation

fig = plt.figure()

ax = plt.axes(xlim=(0, 2), ylim=(0, 100))

N = 4
lines = [plt.plot([], [])[0] for _ in range(N)]

def init():    
    for line in lines:
        line.set_data([], [])
    return lines

def animate(i):
    for j,line in enumerate(lines):
        line.set_data([0, 2], [10 * j,i])
    return lines

anim = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, init_func=init,
                               frames=100, interval=20, blit=True)

plt.show()

Explanations:

  1. line, = plt.plot([], []) assign the first element of the list returned by plt.plot to the veriable line.
  2. line = plt.plot([], []) just assign the whole list (of only one element).

Alternative to lines = [plt.plot([], [])[0] for _ in range(N)] you can do this lines = plt.plot( *([[], []]*N) ) with only one plot command. I found the first more readable but is matter of taste.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. May I ask "what" is the first element of plt.plot list? –  cjorssen Feb 21 '14 at 17:04
    
plt.plot returns a list of matplotlib.artist.Artists, so when you plot only one line it returns a list of only one item: a matplotlib.lines.Line2D artist. But if you plot several lines as in lines = plt.plot( *([[], []]*N) ) it returns all the lines on a list. –  xndrme Feb 21 '14 at 17:26
    
Thanks. One last question. Is the comma after line in the return of animate is not mandatory? If I understand correctly your solution, there is no such comma. –  cjorssen Feb 21 '14 at 18:28
    
There is not comma but check that I do this plt.plot([], [])[0] to get the first value. The line, = plt.plot([], []) syntax is to make this line line = plt.plot([], [])[0] more concise using the unpacking feature of python assignment like on a,b = [1,2] –  xndrme Feb 21 '14 at 19:06
    
Thanks. See my follow-up question. –  cjorssen Feb 22 '14 at 11:46

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