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I can't figure out how to take the absolute value of two std_logic_vector(31 downto 0);

here is an example of the code:

library ieee;
use ieee.std_logic_1164.all;        
use ieee.numeric_std.all;       -- for the signed, unsigned types and arithmetic ops
use ieee.std_logic_arith.all;
use ieee.std_logic_unsigned.all;
...
...
port (  
    X: in std_logic_vector(31 downto 0); 
    Y: in std_logic_vector(31 downto 0); 
    F: out std_logic_vector(31 downto 0) 
  );

..
..
..
process(X,Y)
 begin
 F <= abs(X-Y)     --this doesnt work
share|improve this question
    
How would you compute the absolute value of a binary value using pencil and paper? Just duplicate that algorithm in VHDL. – user1619508 Feb 21 '14 at 17:25
1  
@JoeHass that's the correct answer if you're learning, or if you have to something not built-in, but using the built-in abs on the standard signed type will often synthesize to better code in many FPGA and ASIC vendor's synthesizers which special case some built-in math operations. – wjl Feb 21 '14 at 17:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ditch the non-standard library includes and use the standard signed type which has a built-in abs function:

library ieee;
use ieee.std_logic_1164.all;        
use ieee.numeric_std.all; -- this is the standard package where signed is defined
-- never use non-standard ieee.std_logic_arith and ieee.std_logic_unsigned

...

port (  
  X: in  std_logic_vector(31 downto 0); 
  Y: in  std_logic_vector(31 downto 0); 
  F: out std_logic_vector(31 downto 0) 
);

...

process(X,Y) is
begin
  F <= std_logic_vector(abs(signed(X)-signed(Y)));
end process;

That last line has a lot of [probably needless] converting between std_logic_vector and signed, so you might prefer this interface instead if it makes sense with the rest of your design:

port (  
  X: in  signed(31 downto 0); 
  Y: in  signed(31 downto 0); 
  F: out signed(31 downto 0) 
);

Then the last line is just:

 F <= abs(X-Y);
share|improve this answer
    
hey thanks for the response, when I remove ieee.std_logic_unsigned_all; I can no longer add or subtract the logic vectors. but when I turn the logic vectors into signed it compiles :D I have no idea why – user14864 Feb 21 '14 at 21:13
2  
Because adding std_logic_vectors makes no sense. Adding signeds makes sense; adding unsigneds also makes sense; the right answer may depend on the type... VHDL is about saying exactly what you want to happen. – Brian Drummond Feb 21 '14 at 21:39
2  
Without conveying type there's no way to distinguish between signed and unsigned with only one of each adding, multiplying and signing operators using std_logic_vector. It's a semiotic distinction overcoming a VHDL limitation not a hardware distinction. Also (signed(X)-signed(Y)) conveys the same information to VHDL, treating these std_logic_vector signals as signed. Strong types also sometimes prevents erroneous design specification of operations between signed and unsigned integer representations of std_ulogic arrays. We may get pedantic objections to something allowed in VHDL, too. – user1155120 Feb 21 '14 at 22:46

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