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how do I print help info if no arguments are passed to python script?

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys

for arg in sys.argv:
    if arg == "do":
        do this
    if arg == ""
        print "usage is bla bla bla"

what I'm missing is if arg == "" line that I don't know how to express :(

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7 Answers 7

if len(sys.argv) == 1:
    # Print usage...

The first element of sys.argv is always either the name of the script itself, or an empty string. If sys.argv has only one element, then there must have been no arguments.

http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.argv

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if len(sys.argv)<2:

The name of the program is always in sys.argv[0]

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2  
I would have just said == 1 but it's all the same. –  Chris Lutz Feb 3 '10 at 18:01
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As others have said, you can check if any args were passed in by doing:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
args = sys.argv[1:]

if args:
    for arg in args:
        if arg == "do":
            # do this
else:
    print "usage is bla bla bla"

However, there is a Python module called OptParse that was developed explicitly for parsing command line arguments when running a script. I would suggest looking into this, as it's a bit more "standards compliant" (As in, it's the expected and accepted method of command line parsing within the Python community).

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"Use optparse" is the right answer for non-trivial programs. –  Troy J. Farrell Feb 3 '10 at 20:49
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The following is a very Pythonic way of solving your problem, because it deliberately generates an exception within try .. except:

import sys

try:   
   sys.argv[1:] // do sth with sys,argv[1:]  
except IndexError:  
   print "usage is..."
   sys.exit()
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#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
args = sys.argv[1:]

if args:
    for arg in args:
        if arg == "do":
            # do this
else:
    print "usage is bla bla bla"
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the if followed by the for feels a bit redundant to me. I added a variation of your answer to show what I mean –  gnibbler Feb 3 '10 at 19:44
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Based on Noctis Skytower's answer

import sys
args = sys.argv[1:]

for arg in args:
    if arg == "do":
        # do this

if not args:
    print "usage is bla bla bla"
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There is a problem with your second example. You have to break before you enter the else block if you do not want it to run. –  Noctis Skytower Feb 3 '10 at 20:46
    
@Noctis Skytower. Yeah you're right, I'll delete it –  gnibbler Feb 3 '10 at 20:55
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I recommend you use the lib optparse [1], is more elegant :D

[1] More powerful command line option parser < http://docs.python.org/library/optparse.html >

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+1 for optparse! –  jathanism Feb 4 '10 at 2:13
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