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I was reading about how circular references cause memory leaks in IE, but I was pretty confused on an example using a closure within closure to break the circular reference:

function addHandler() {
    var clickHandler = function() {
        this.style.backgroundColor = 'red';
    };
    (function() {
        var el = document.getElementById('el');
        el.onclick = clickHandler;
    })();
}

My head got all wrangled with what referenced to what, which are the closures, which are the scope objects. Can someone break it down more explicitly than MDN? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you had

function addHandler() {
    var clickHandler = function() {
        this.style.backgroundColor = 'red';
        // can access `el` here
    };
    var el = document.getElementById('el');
    el.onclick = clickHandler;
}

then el has a reference to clickHandler, but clickHandler also has a reference to el, because it's a closure. -> circular reference (in IE)

By introducing a new scope, you make el local, so it it is not accessible by clickHandler, -> no circular reference.

function addHandler() {
    var clickHandler = function() {
        this.style.backgroundColor = 'red';
        // cannot access `el` here
    };
    (function() {
        // `el` is local to this immediately invoked function
        var el = document.getElementById('el');
        el.onclick = clickHandler;
    })();
}

So, the solution to the memory leak problem is not to introduce yet another closure, it is to create a new scope, that "shields" the values from each other (in one direction at least).

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so in the 1st example, even though el was not explicitly referenced in clickHandler, el still existed in clickHandler's scope object? Meaning, even though clickHandler can reference el, clickHandler has access to the el reference with or without the explicit reference? Thus creating a circular reference between el in clickHandler's scope object and clickHandler in el's object? I just want to make sure, that this statement in clickHandler wasn't causing the circular reference to el, rather than scope object making that reference. –  Tri Noensie Feb 27 '14 at 17:37
1  
@TriNoensie: No, it has nothing to do with this. When a function is created, it also gets a reference to the "scope" the function is created in, i.e. it has an implicit reference to all variables that are also accessible in the scope it was created. And this caused problems in IE. –  Felix Kling Feb 27 '14 at 19:35

The rules of thumb that I go by:

For JavaScript closures to be created, there has to be nested functions and the inner function must have access to or is refered to by (let's just say "touch" for short) a variable in the outer function. If either of these 2 criteria is not found, then there's no closure in JavaScript.

Memory leaks occur when such variable (mentioned in the above paragraph) in the outer function happens to be a DOM element.

In the Mozilla article, let's visit the first example:

function addHandler() {
    var el = document.getElementById('el');
    el.onclick = function() {
        this.style.backgroundColor = 'red';
    };
}

Clearly, there is one function nested inside another function, and the inner function is assigned to a property of a variable (el) in the outer scope, so there is a closure created. This variable el also happens to be a DOM element, hence there's memory leak as explained in the article.

In the second example that you posted,

function addHandler() {
    var clickHandler = function() {
        this.style.backgroundColor = 'red';
    };
    (function() {
        var el = document.getElementById('el');
        el.onclick = clickHandler;
    })();
}

There's an outer function, and nested inside this outer function are 2 nested (inner) functions, but they are at the same level, meaning one is not nested inside the other. The second nested function also has access to a local variable (clickHandler) in the outer function, so there's a closure that gets created. However, there's no memory leaks because this local variable (clickHandler) in the outer function is not a DOM element. The local variable el does not contribute to memory leaks because it's local to the second nested function and not defined in the outer function addHandler(). In other words, it is local to the second nested function, it is not accessible to the first nested function, hence there's no chance for memory leaks.

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