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I would like a command line incantation to reverse the field order of arbritrary length text records. Solutions provided in Rearrange columns using cut and Elegant way to reverse column order don't solve this issue since they assume a fixed amount of fields, though maybe they would with minor changes.

Sort of like the tac command that exhibits reverse cat functionality. I'd like what the ohce command would do (if it existed) to reverse echo functinality.

For example:

a b c d
e f
g h i

Should be transformed to

d c b a
f e
i h g
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's a command to do it, it's named rev from util-linux :

$ rev file
d c b a
f e
i h g

or using :

$ perl -lane 'print join " ", reverse @F' file
d c b a
f e
i h g

But like you explain in the comments, if you want the 3 latest columns, you can use :

awk '{print $(NF-2), $(NF-1), $NF}' file
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1  
rev reverses characters, so a line like abc def would appear as fed cba. The question is ambiguous, so @chiam will have to clarify. –  glenn jackman Feb 21 '14 at 21:09
    
With this two solutions, OP have the choice, they treat both cases. –  StardustOne Feb 21 '14 at 21:15
    
Fixed perl version by adding newlines for each lines –  StardustOne Feb 22 '14 at 17:12
    
Sorry for the ambiguity, but the fact that rev reverses all the characters doesn't affect its usefulness for me, just apply it again. echo give me the last three fields | rev | (read a b c ignore the rest; echo $a $b $c) | rev –  Chaim Geretz Feb 24 '14 at 16:18
1  
See my awk solution if you want the 3 latest columns. –  StardustOne Feb 24 '14 at 16:26

Using awk:

awk '{for (i=NF; i>1; i--) printf "%s%s", $i, FS; print $i }' file
d c b a
f e
i h g
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with bash:

while read -ra words; do 
    for ((i=${#words[@]}-1; i>=0; i--)); do 
        printf "%s " "${words[i]}"
    done
    echo
done < file
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