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I have been seeing/hearing different terminologies with SSO and not sure which ones are correct. Recently saw something on the IBM website saying: "SAML 2.0 endpoints and URLs". I would rather say "SAML-based Identity Provider endpoints" or a "SAML-based Service Provider endpoints", but not "SAML endpoints". So here are the terminologies, please correct me:


  1. SAML-based Identity provider (the identity provider that is using SAML as the standard)
  2. SAML-based SSO service provider (the service provider that accepts SAML-based authentication messages)
  3. SAML-based Identity Provider endpoint URL (the URL of the identity issuer)
  4. SAML-based Service Provider endpoint URL (the URL of the service provider's listener)
  5. x.509 certificate
  6. SSO Server (the server that hosts the identity provider?)

The followings I believe are incorrect, please correct me if I am wrong:

  1. SAML endpoint
  2. SAML certificate (there is no such thing as a SAML certificate, the certificate is x.509 or SHA or other formats)
  3. SAML x.509 certificate
  4. SAML server

Please let me know what you guys think is the correct terminologies and which ones are incorrect. Also add if you have heard/read incorrect terminologies often that should be avoided.


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It's not about which is 'correct', it's about communicating with others and them understanding what you're saying. I worked with SAML software for years and "SAML endpoint" is really common terminology. Although nobody said "SAML-based Identity Provider endpoints" I understand exactly what you mean. – tom Feb 26 '14 at 17:12
Thanks Tom, but terminology is predefined and there is correct and incorrect terminologies. "SAML endpoint" or "SAML software" could mean anything and nothing. SAML Software, hmmm... software that is utilizing SAML for certain functionalities? I don't know. SAML is not exclusive to SSO, it is a Security Assertion Markup Language. – naveed sorush Feb 28 '14 at 18:28

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