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I prefer to document each parameter (as needed) on the same line where I declare the parameter in order to apply D.R.Y.

If I have code like this:

def foo(
        flab_nickers, # a series of under garments to process
        has_polka_dots=False,
        needs_pressing=False  # Whether the list of garments should all be pressed
   ):
    ...

How can I avoid repeating the parameters in the doc string and retain the parameter explanations?

I want to avoid:

def foo(
        flab_nickers, # a series of under garments to process
        has_polka_dots=False,
        needs_pressing=False  # Whether the list of garments should all be pressed
    ):
    '''Foo does whatever.

    * flab_nickers - a series of under garments to process
    * needs_pressing - Whether the list of garments should all be pressed.
      [Default False.]

Is this possible in python 2.6 or python 3 with some sort of decorator manipulation? Is there some other way?

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If your RST is clean enough (Sphinx's params really don't help), it should be easy enough to look at the function definition then down into the docstring. I eschew the default Sphinx style (with its params) and go for the Google style which looks far better in the code, and still decent when rendered (this question talks about getting best-of-both worlds). –  Nick T Aug 26 '13 at 20:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would do this.

Starting with this code.

def foo(
        flab_nickers, # a series of under garments to process
        has_polka_dots=False,
        needs_pressing=False  # Whether the list of garments should all be pressed
   ):
    ...

I would write a parser that grabs the function parameter definitions and builds the following:

def foo(
        flab_nickers, 
        has_polka_dots=False,
        needs_pressing=False,
   ):
   """foo

   :param flab_nickers: a series of under garments to process
   :type flab_nickers: list or tuple
   :param has_polka_dots: default False
   :type has_polka_dots: bool
   :param needs_pressing: default False, Whether the list of garments should all be pressed
   :type needs_pressing: bool
   """
    ...

That's some pretty straight-forward regex processing of the various arguments string patterns to fill in the documentation template.

A lot of good Python IDEs (for example PyCharm) understand the default Sphinx param notation and even flag vars/methods in the scope that IDE thinks does not conform to the declared type.

Note the extra comma in the code; that's just to make things consistent. It does no harm, and it might simplify things in the future.

You can also try and use the Python compiler to get a parse tree, revise it and emit the update code. I've done this for other languages (not Python), so I know a little bit about it, but don't know how well supported it is in Python.

Also, this is a one-time transformation.

The original in-line comments in the function definition don't really follow DRY because it's a comment, in an informal language, and unusable by any but the most sophisticated tools.

The Sphinx comments are closer to DRY because they're in the RST markup language, making them much easier to process using ordinary text-parsing tools in docutils.

It's only DRY if tools can make use of it.

Useful links: https://pythonhosted.org/an_example_pypi_project/sphinx.html#function-definitions http://sphinx-doc.org/domains.html#id1

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2  
The Python Docs for 'an_example_pypi_project' shows Sphinx docstring formatting options. –  Mike Pennington Sep 10 '11 at 3:35
    
No, the comment in that document won't work: "Args: name (str): The name to use." –  MeaCulpa Jun 28 '12 at 2:06

Annotations are meant to partly address this problem in Python 3:

http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-3107/

I'm not sure if there has been any work in applying these to Sphinx yet.

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You can't do that without a preprocessor, as comments don't exist for Python once the source has been compiled. To avoid repeating yourself, remove the comments and document the parameters only in the docstring, this is the standard way to document your arguments.

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Maybe it is a bad habit, but I acquired the taste for inline documentation after using Verilog (hardware design language) where parameter lists for top level modules can have a hundred parameters. So if you put the Verilog parameter documentation away from the actual parameter documentation line, they could be separated by 100 lines, which is really bad for maintainability. –  Ross Rogers Feb 3 '10 at 19:54
    
And for these top level verilog modules you have many people modifying this file, so you can't rely on people being good citizens. Anyways, you may be right. It could be a square peg in a round hole. –  Ross Rogers Feb 3 '10 at 20:00
    
@Ross Rogers: Sphinx will identify the bad citizens for you. If the :param name: doesn't match the actual arguments, you get warnings. –  S.Lott Feb 3 '10 at 20:19
    
@Ross Rogers: Yes: Square Peg Round Hole. 100's of parameter lists in Python would be a code smell. If you've got parameter lists like that, you're probably doing something wrong. –  S.Lott Feb 3 '10 at 20:53
    
@Lott. - I don't have 100's of parameters :-) I was just explaining where this hare-brained notion came from. A certain method does have 7 args. In Verilog, however 100 parameters is absolutely necessary because cross-module references can't synthesize to gates with certain hardware synthesis tools. –  Ross Rogers Feb 3 '10 at 22:10

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