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I am new to the forums so I'm sorry if this post is incorrect.

I have the code as follows:

#!/bin/bash

number=0

while (true); do
echo "Your number is: $number"
echo ""
echo "Press space to add one to your number."
echo ""
read -t 1 -n 1 input

if [ "$input" == " " ]; then
    number=$((number+1))
fi
done

I want to make it so that the person can't just hold the space bar to increase the number. Is there a way I can make it so that the person can press the space bar only after the timeout is done?

In other words, if you enter a key at 0.25 seconds, you don't just skip through to the next step, the program wait 0.75 more seconds for it to continue, thus making a total of 1 second.

Just like if you press enter to submit input in the normal read command without -n 1, it continues even if the timeout isn't finished. Another way could be to sleep while reading user input, and terminate it once the sleep is done.

I have also tried this:

read -n 1 input & sleep 1 & wait

And then this pops up:

[15] 94977
[16] 94978

[15]+  Stopped                 read -n 1 input
[16]   Done                    sleep 1

Why does it stop the process, when it is supposed to run them at the same time? The following code runs all three at the same time:

sleep 1 & sleep 2 & sleep 3 & wait

In total, it sleeps for 3 seconds, and not 6.

I hope you understand what I am saying here.

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2  
FYI, while (true) is much less efficient than while true, since it spawns a subshell and invokes true in that. –  Charles Duffy Feb 22 at 4:53

3 Answers 3

don't put "& sleep" put sleep on a new line

read -n 1 -t 1 input sleep 1

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That's not the problem. What I want to do is make it so that you can only press space in a one second time frame, so that there is a standard sleep time and not a varying one. –  danerieber Feb 22 at 4:12

How do you see it?

You can try(as my friend @jaypal guide):

#!/bin/bash

number=0
while (true); do
    echo "Your number is: $number"
    IFS= read -t 5 -n 1 -p "Press space to add one to your number: " input
    # Check for Space
    if [[ $input =~ \ + ]]; then
       echo "space found"
       let number=number+1
       echo "$number"
    # Check if input is NULL
    elif [[ -z "$input" ]]; then
       echo "input is NULL"
    fi
done

In bash, read has a -t option where you can specify a timeout. From the manpage:

read [-ers] [-u fd] [-t timeout] [-a aname] [-p prompt] [-n nchars] [-d delim] [name ...]

-t timeout: cause read to time out and return failure if a complete line of input is not read within timeout seconds. This option has no effect if read is not reading input from the terminal or a pipe.

Transcript below (without hitting ENTER):

$ date ; read -t 10 -p "Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds" ; echo ; date
Tue Feb 28 22:29:15 WAST 2012
Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds
Tue Feb 28 22:29:25 WAST 2012

Another, hitting ENTER after a couple of seconds:

$ date ; read -t 10 -p "Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds" ; date
Tue Feb 28 22:30:17 WAST 2012
Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds
Tue Feb 28 22:30:19 WAST 2012

And another, hitting CTRL+C:

$ date ; read -t 10 -p "Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds" ; echo ; date
Tue Feb 28 22:30:29 WAST 2012
Hit ENTER or wait ten seconds
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Try this!

Change:read -n 1 input & sleep 1 & wait

to

This:read -n 1 input && sleep 1

The reason being is that & will run a program/command in background. the && will run after the last program/command has completed and only if it exited with an error status of 1 (sucessful execution), or you could also use ; this will tell it to run after the last program/command and care about the exit status. If possible I would also suggest using usleep instead of sleep if it is installed same syntax but it would be microseconds instead of seconds. usleep 1000 = sleep 1

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