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I would like to show only the last 5 transactions for each account type from the "bank" table. The structure for the bank table is:

CREATE TABLE bank(
bnk_id INT(11) AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
......
bnk_acc_id INT(11) NOT NULL
)

The way I got it to work now is by having to create a temporary tables as follows

CREATE TABLE B1 AS 
SELECT bnk_id FROM bank WHERE bnk_acc_id=1 ORDER BY bnk_date DESC LIMIT 5;

CREATE TABLE B2 AS 
SELECT bnk_id FROM bank WHERE bnk_acc_id=2 ORDER BY bnk_date DESC LIMIT 5;

Then I would run the following query

SELECT * 
  FROM bank
 WHERE bnk_id IN (SELECT * FROM B1)
    OR bnk_id IN (SELECT * FROM B2)

By the way there are 6 different account type (represented in the table as bnk_acc_id) I would think that there is a more efficient way to write this SQL statement. Please send me an advice.

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This eliminates the extra temporary table.

SELECT * FROM bank WHERE bnk_acc_id=1 ORDER BY bnk_date DESC LIMIT 5;
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM bank WHERE bnk_acc_id=2 ORDER BY bnk_date DESC LIMIT 5;
share|improve this answer

You need to partition your data into the groups of rows for each account. You can then use this grouped data to retrieve the first n out of each group. This means you dont have to specify account ids in each select.

Here is an example using a temporary table to hold some example data for you:

CREATE TABLE [#bank]
(
    bnk_id INT IDENTITY(1, 1) PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
    bnk_acc_id INT NOT NULL,
    bnk_date datetime NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES (1, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(1, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(1, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(1, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(1, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(1, getutcdate())

INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(2, getutcdate())


INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())
INSERT INTO [#bank] (bnk_acc_id, bnk_date) VALUES(3, getutcdate())


GO
WITH [Grouped] AS (
SELECT bnk_id
     , bnk_acc_id
     , bnk_date
     , ROW_NUMBER()
     OVER (
       PARTITION BY [bnk_acc_id]
       ORDER BY [bnk_date] DESC
     ) [RowInGroup]
FROM [#bank]
)

SELECT * FROM [Grouped]
        WHERE [RowInGroup] <= 5


DROP TABLE [#bank]

The main part is

WITH [Grouped] AS (
SELECT bnk_id
     , bnk_acc_id
     , bnk_date
     , ROW_NUMBER()
     OVER (
       PARTITION BY [bnk_acc_id]
       ORDER BY [bnk_date] DESC
     ) [RowInGroup]
FROM [#bank]
)

SELECT * FROM [Grouped]
        WHERE [RowInGroup] <= 5

This will create your groupe data, then filter it accordingly.

More infor on partitioning at MSDN:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186734.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
For future answers: if a question is tagged with sql the answer should be standard SQL. The tag sql refers to the query language not to a specific DBMS product (and not to SQL Server). (I'm referring to the non-standard way of quoting identifiers using [..] - The common table expression and window functions are standard SQL) – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 22 '14 at 12:05

Depending on your database, you may have access to window functions. For instance, in PostgreSQL, you could write this query as

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT *, row_number() OVER (PARTITION BY bnk_acc_id 
                                 ORDER BY bnk_date DESC) rn
    FROM bank
) AS b
WHERE rn <= 5
ORDER BY bnk_acc_id, bnk_date DESC

This works by assigning a row number to each row partitioned by associated bank and ordered by date, then filtering down to the first 5 row numbers for each bank.

From your SQL samples, it looks like you're using MySQL, which sadly does not have window functions. In that case, the answer by Gideon Wise may be your best bet. Also, MySQL does have user defined variables which may be used to emulate window functions, as explained in the blog post Analytic functions: FIRST_VALUE, LAST_VALUE, LEAD, LAG. However, this may too inefficient for your needs, since you're likely to end up with full table scans.

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