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I have been learning arrays, but theres one thing that I cant figure out. I borrowed two books for C and looked online, but found no solution.

My function timesTen multiplies every array elemenet that I have by 10, then returns pointer of that array back function main()

How can I copy array a[2] directly in array x[2]?

I would usually use for loop, but I cant, because arguments are in two different functions.

Solution has probably got something to do with pointers, so feel free to post sollution here, but is there any way around them aswell?

Heres the source code:

#include <stdio.h>

int timesTen(int a[])
{
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<2;i++)
    {
    printf("%d\t", a[i]);
    a[i]*=10;
    printf("%d\n", a[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    int i;
    int x[2];
    int a[2]={10,50};

// i know here's an error, but how do I fix it? I cant put x[0]=timesTen(a[0])
    x[2]  =  timesTen(a);
//also what if there is array a[10], and I want to copy it in x[5] 
    for (i=0;i<2;i++)
        printf("%d\n", x[i]);
    return 0;
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Was it your intent to have your products separate from your input data? If so, you can pass your output array just as you're passing your input array and fill it in your function as you compute your products. If you just want to overwrite the old operands with the results, passing x isn't needed (and by the looks of it, neither is the variable in main() either if that is the case). –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '14 at 10:36
    
what if there is array a[10], and I want to copy it in x[5]? What if I have 10 litres of water and I want to fit it in a 5-litre container? –  Shahbaz Feb 22 '14 at 10:55

5 Answers 5

In the function timesTen, since a is an array, each modification made to it in the function is also done to the parameter you passed (call by address not by value). Therefore you don't need to returns anything.

void timesTen(int a[])
{
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<2;i++) a[i]*=10;
}

And you just call it by:

timesTen(a);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. just what i needed –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 10:31
    
@user3272749 : please read stackoverflow.com/help/someone-answers –  hivert Feb 22 '14 at 10:43
    
oh sorry I didnt know my bad :/ wont hapen again –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 10:46
    
@user3272749 : No problem ! I'm just trying to improve your skill as a SO user :-). –  hivert Feb 22 '14 at 10:58
    
I'd thank you if it wasnt agains the rules of this site ;) hehe –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 11:59

What you need to understand is the distinction between arrays and pointers. When you declare your two arrays in main(), you allocate two times memory for two integers. That's fine. But in C, you simply cannot pass arrays around (as in: implicitly allocate a new slap of memory and copy the data of the source array into this memory region). Instead, any array identifier will decay to a pointer to the first element of the array in almost all situation. So when you write

int x[2];
int a[2]={10,50};
timesTen(a);

this code is precisely equivalent to

int x[2];
int a[2]={10,50};
timesTen(&a[0]);

So, why does that not clash with your declaration of timesTen()? Because array parameters in function declarations decay right there, on the spot, into a pointer! So, your function declaration is precisely equivalent to this one:

int timesTen(int* a) {

This is one of the least understood features of the C language, and admittedly, it is hard to wrap your brain around this, but once you understand what pointer decay means, you will be much more at ease using pointers and arrays.

So, back to your question. Since you passed only a pointer to your array to timesTen(), and since you modify this array, the changes are directly visible in main(). There are two ways to achieve the behavior you want:

  1. You can change the definition of timesTen() to copy the data into a destination array:

    void timesTen(int size, int* source, int* dest) {
        for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) dest[i] = 10*source[i];
    }
    
    int main() {
        int x[2];
        int a[2]={10,50};
        timesTen(2, a, x);    //pointer decay!
        //x now contains {100, 500}
    }
    
  2. You can copy the data into the destination array before calling your function to modify the destination array:

    void timesTen(int size, int* data) {
        for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) data[i] = 10*data[i];
    }
    
    int main() {
        int x[2];
        int a[2]={10,50};
        memcpy(x, a, sizeof(a));    //the sizeof operator is one of only two places where no pointer decay happens!
        timesTen(2, x);    //pointer decay!
        //x now contains {100, 500}
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) dest[i] = 10*source[i]; Im not sure how it works for you, but I cant initialize integer in for loop. It says I need C99 version or something. Whats the difference + should I get it? –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 12:02
    
Yes, it's a part of the C99 standard. With gcc, you can compile C99 code by using the -std=c99 flag on the command line. However, while you are at it, you should probably use -std=c11 instead, as the C11 standard is the current one. You can also switch on GNU extensions to the language using -std=gnu11, this however has the disadvantage that you can write code that does not compile with other compilers. –  cmaster Feb 22 '14 at 12:29
    
But I dont see many more useful features than just for(INT i;;) is it truly better to download/use this mode? –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 13:20
    
As I said, C11 is the current standard of the language itself. As such, you can expect any up to date compiler to be able to compile C11 code. It's just that, for some obscure reason, gcc still defaults to the C90 standart (plus GNU extensions), which is plain outdated. I would always use at least -std=c11, there is simply no point in writing code in an outdated language. Heck, C11 will probably be outdated in 15 years as well... –  cmaster Feb 22 '14 at 13:28

You probably want something like this:

 timesTen(a);
 memmove(x, a, 2 * sizeof(x[0]));

instead of

 x[2]  =  timesTen(a);

Note that your function does not need to return anything, because it is modifying the array on its original place. In C if you have an array parameter, it means that only a pointer is passed, not the whole array.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that'd probably work, but I'd like a simpler solution, the one that I could think about myself and not just forget in a month (like this memmove function). –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 10:26
1  
Note, that this will leave the array a modified, which might not be what you want. If you want the data in a unchanged, do the memmove()/memcpy() before calling timesTen(x). –  cmaster Feb 22 '14 at 10:54

in main function:

   int *p;
   int i;

   p = timesTen(a);
   for ( i = 0; i < 2; i++ )
   {
       printf( "%d\n",*(p + i)); // here you can print the values returned from your function 
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Well thats exactly what I was looking for. Thats solves my issue :) but there is no way around pointers in my case? EDIT : solved below –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 10:30
    
You need @hivert's solution, you just don't need second array –  Dabo Feb 22 '14 at 10:32
    
Then i guess, i can ask for an upvote for solving your issue. –  Emu Feb 22 '14 at 10:41
    
I dont have the reputation yet :D You can upvote me so I can upvote people soon i guess –  user3272749 Feb 22 '14 at 10:43

Through pointers you could have eaisly managed it

main ()
     { 
        int a[ 2 ];
        int *ptr = timesTen(a);
        for ( int i=0; i<2 ; i++)
              {
                  printf("%d",ptr[i]);
              }

And as far as

  x[2] = timesTen(a);

Is concerned note that x[2] will give "value at 2nd adress from adrees of base that is x" And it is not a variable but it is a value and you cant assign to a value. Technically x[2] is not a lvalue.

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