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I need to understand how a linked list works in this C++ code. I got it from my textbook. Could someone explain in detail what exactly is going on here?

/*The  Node Class*/
class Node{
    private:
        int object;
        Node *nextNode;  

    public:            
        int get()
        {
            return object;    
        }
        void set(int object)
        {
            this-> object=object;     
        }
        Node *getNext()
        {
            return nextNode;     
        };
        void setNext(Node *nextNode)
        {
            this->nextNode = nextNode;
        };
};



/* The List class */
class List
{
    public:
        List();
        void add (int addObject);
        int get();
        bool next();
        friend void traverse(List list);
        friend List addNodes();
    private:
        int size;
        Node * headNode;
        Node * currentNode;
        Node * lastCurrentNode;
};
/* Constructor */
List::List()
{
    headNode = new Node();
    headNode->setNext(NULL);
    currentNode = NULL;
    lastCurrentNode = NULL;
    size = 0;
}
/* add() class method */
void List::add (int addObject)
{
    Node * newNode = new Node();
    newNode->set(addObject);
    if( currentNode != NULL )
    {
        newNode->setNext(currentNode->getNext());
        currentNode->setNext( newNode );
        lastCurrentNode = currentNode;
        currentNode = newNode;
    }
    else
    {
        newNode->setNext(NULL);
        headNode->setNext(newNode);
        lastCurrentNode = headNode;
        currentNode = newNode;
    }
    size ++;
}
/* get() class method */
int List::get()
{
    if (currentNode != NULL)
        return currentNode->get();
}
/* next() class method */
bool List::next()
{
    if (currentNode == NULL) return false;
    lastCurrentNode = currentNode;
    currentNode = currentNode->getNext();
    if (currentNode == NULL || size == 0)
        return false;
    else
        return true;
}
/* Friend function to traverse linked list */
void traverse(List list)
{
    Node* savedCurrentNode = list.currentNode;
    list.currentNode = list.headNode;
    for(int i = 1; list.next(); i++)
    {
        cout<<"\n Element "<<i<<" "<<list.get();
    }
    list.currentNode = savedCurrentNode;
}
/* Friend function to add Nodes into the list */
List addNodes()
{
    List list;
    list.add(2);
    list.add(8);
    list.add(7);
    list.add(1);
    cout<<"\n List size = "<<list.size<<"\n";
    return list;
}


main()
{
    List list = addNodes();
    traverse(list);

    system("pause");
}
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closed as not constructive by SingerOfTheFall, S.L. Barth, interjay, Veger, Christoph Nov 8 '12 at 16:56

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3  
You're going to have trouble getting help with your track record of Q and A. That and there are many online resources to explain how a linked list works. –  wheaties Feb 3 '10 at 21:00
6  
You got this code from your text book, yet the text book doesn't explain how it works? Here's linked lists on wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_list –  Adam Crossland Feb 3 '10 at 21:04
3  
You might get some good help if you can choose a specific part of the above implementation that you don't understand and offer an explanation of what you think it might do. –  Kaleb Pederson Feb 3 '10 at 21:04
    
Thanks Adam for the wiki link you have provided me for explaining linked lists! –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 4 '10 at 21:00
    
What are Friend functions in C++? Bare with me a C++ is new languge for me. Alas whats happening in the Traverse and Next methods here? –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 6 '10 at 10:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

what you've posted is a very basic implementation of a linked list. The objects that you're linking is "node".

GetNext function gets the next node in the list and the setNex function gets the next node in the list.

i'm sure the chapter should have an explanation for the code, at the very least the explanation for the concept of linked list.

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. In the List class, i understand what is a currentNode and also the lastCurrentNode. But is a headNode? What is it used for? –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 5 '10 at 11:12
    
head node allows you to instant reference to the front of the list. Since this is a linked list (not a random access array), you'll need to start traversing(or searching) from the head node to find the node you want. –  aggietech Feb 5 '10 at 15:00
    
Got it! Now it is crystal to me. –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 5 '10 at 18:55

explanation for the node class part of this code:

the node is an object with two pieces of information a number and a link to another (the next) node.

it allows you to literally make a linked list of objects holding information. in this case each node only allows you to hold a number (an integer is a type of number where you can only store whole values and not decimal values)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. In the List class, i understand what is a currentNode and also the lastCurrentNode. But is a headNode? What is it used for? –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 5 '10 at 11:12
1  
headnode is a reference to the first node in your list. it is separate from currentnode so you can set currentnode without losing the headnode. without headnode you wouldn't be able to get a reference to the first item in the list in order to begin traversal –  PeanutPower Feb 5 '10 at 11:26
    
Thank you so much. –  Muhammad Maqsoodur Rehman Feb 5 '10 at 18:56

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