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Something that has bothered me about Meteor is the way that events are attached to the templates. It's not so much a gripe about not being able to use jQuery, but I just can't suspend my suspicion that something is wrong with the way these are written.

Here's a condensed example:

Template.input.events = {
    'mousedown input#message' : function(event){
        console.log('the mouse was pressed');
    },

    'touchstart input#message' : function(event){
        console.log('a finger was pressed');
    },
}

Can anyone explain to me why the event name and the query selector would be combined into a single string like 'mousedown input#message'? I just don't understand why anyone would want to make something that worked this way.

If it were me, I would nest the events under each selector like so. Note: this code doesn't work, it's just how I think it should look.

Template.input.events = {
    'input#message' : {
        'mousedown' : function(event){
            console.log('the mouse was pressed');
        },

        'touchstart' : function(event){
            console.log('a finger was pressed');
        }
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One reason is that you can use an event name without a selector to attach events to a template itself. One common use case for this is to attach a submit event handler to a template containing a form:

Template.someForm.events({
  "submit": function() {
    /*...*/
  }
});

Also, you can use a comma separated list to use the same handler function for multiple event types. This even allows you to use the same event handler for different types of events on entirely different elements. Maybe you want to create an event handler that fires when the user either clicks a save button or presses the "s" key with something focused in the template. Meteor's event system allows this to be defined in the event map with just one definition:

Template.someTemplate.events({
  "keyup, click .save": function(event, template) {
    if (event.type === "keyup" && event.which !== 83) return;

    // save
  }
});

In your case, I might just do this:

Template.input.events({
  "mousedown #message, touchstart #message" : function(event){
    // you can do different things by examining event.type
  }
});

However, despite the advantages of Meteor's event maps, it's easy to use your format if you want. Here's a function that takes an event map in your format and transforms it into a Meteor event map:

// Call it whatever you want
var transformEvents = function(selectorEvents) {
  return _.reduce(selectorEvents, function(meteorEvents, events, selector) {
    _.each(events, function(handler, eventType) {
      meteorEvents[eventType + " " + selector] = handler;
    });
    return meteorEvents;
  }, {});
};

Just pass your style of event map through this and it will turn it into a Meteor compatible one :)

As far as not being able to use jQuery, the reason for this is that Meteor's event system automatically scopes your event handlers to a template instance, which would be very difficult to do with jQuery alone. Technically I don't think there's anything stopping you from using jQuery events, but it would cause some major headaches that Meteor's event system avoids.

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1  
This is fascinating. You have to admit that it's a real weird thing to do though. How does meteor know the difference between an event and a CSS selector? Is it the order? And if it is the order, why not use a function with two parameters or something that can throw errors when you've done something wrong? Is it a regex and the order doesn't matter? I just worry about the names of my stuff being essentially eval'd wrong. That aside, this was really enlightening and cool. –  Wray Bowling Feb 24 at 22:00
2  
As with most things, it's a balancing act. Yes, the order is what determines it; event name is mandatory, selector is optional. As explained in the docs the format will always follow some combination of "eventtype", "eventtype selector", and "event1, event2". This ensures there is no ambiguity, but one limitation of this is that you can not use comma separated selectors as you would in CSS. If you had a function with two parameters, you lose that ability to assign one handler to the same map, like "click .current, mouseenter .next, keydown". –  sbking Feb 24 at 22:15
1  
I'm not really sure how you would get any more error-checking ability from a function, either. This event map syntax doesn't really cause ambiguity. One of the beautiful things about using a JavaScript object is that it is highly mutable. As I demonstrated, it is very simple to make a function that generates a Meteor event map from whatever kind of input/map you want. Another thing to note is that the new template engine coming out uses jQuery for event delegation, and is much more compatible with user-defined jQuery events. –  sbking Feb 24 at 22:18
    
@WrayBowling One final note, if you compare it to some other systems like jQuery, .Net, etc it does certainly seem backwards. Most of these frameworks have you select an element/component, and then attach the handler to it. I think what this really demonstrates is a fundamental difference in Meteor's philosophy, which is about attempting to make a more declarative, template-driven UI API, rather than a more traditional imperative UI API. –  sbking Feb 24 at 22:31
    
"This event map syntax doesn't really cause ambiguity." That, I won't immediately agree with. From the "code is meant to be read" standpoint, the comma quirk adds ambiguity. Meteor is changing how we write selectors and that's smelly syntax. I'm glad they're changing it to be more jQuery-like. Great stuff, Cuberto. –  Wray Bowling Feb 24 at 22:32

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