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I was told, that I should use the Fluent Query Builder in Laravel instead of raw MySQL queries because Fluent will prevent SQL injections and other type of malicious user input attack so querying that way is safer. Is this true? Isn't the Query Builder used only for making the query code more readable?

For example, is there a difference between the following two ways of data selection from a security aspect? Is the first one used only for making the process prettier?

DB::table('users')->where('name', Input::get('name'))->get();
DB::select(DB::raw('SELECT * FROM users WHERE name = ' . Input::get('name')));
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From the documentation: Note: The Laravel query builder uses PDO parameter binding throughout to protect your application against SQL injection attacks. There is no need to clean strings being passed as bindings. – Amal Murali Feb 22 '14 at 14:53

Is this true? Isn't the Query Builder used only for making the query code more readable?

Yes, it is true. Query Builder helps prevent SQL injection attacks by using PDO's parameterized queries.

Straight from the documentation for Query Builder:

Note: The Laravel query builder uses PDO parameter binding throughout to protect your application against SQL injection attacks. There is no need to clean strings being passed as bindings.

For example, is there a difference between the following two ways of data selection from a security aspect? Is the first one used only for making the process prettier?

Yes, there is great difference between those two methods. In the first query, the user input is always sanitized prior to inserting into the database. In the second method, you're inserting the raw user input. Bobby-Tables would like to have a word with you!

Obligatory XKCD:

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There is a big difference between uses a raw sql and a query buider or ORM.I could write you some of them:

  • RAW SQL uses less memory than a Query Builder, cause query builder call other functions and them uses some of memory RAM
  • RAW SQL could not be safe in order to prevent SQL injections, that Query builders have as a one of their targets on SQL execution.
  • RAW SQL could be harder if you don't have good SQL knowledge, then Query Builders are easier to manage simple and complex querys
  • Making a wrong RAW SQL query, could means a wrong memory usage and crash your system, however Query Builders are optimized for make and execute complex sql queries on an efficient way
  • RAW SQL is for a specific engine, on the other side, Query builders are maked for prepare SQL for many engines

I could continue on other stuff, however on my side, I though it could help you on what you are looking for

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I dont know the framework(s), but I can give it a guess :)

When using the Fluent Query Builder DB::table('users')->where('name', Input::get('name'))->get(); The input may be undergoing several validation (and security) steps, before the query is ran.

I haven't read the full article, but here they describe a number of ways to prevent injection. https://www.owasp.org/index.php/SQL_Injection_Prevention_Cheat_Sheet

Also, I found that Laravel Fluent Query Builder uses PDO parameter binding (the first method in the link), so they don't just create a "simple" SQL query like the one you proposed.

Note: The Laravel query builder uses PDO parameter binding throughout to protect your application against SQL injection attacks. There is no need to clean strings being passed as bindings.

http://laravel.com/docs/queries

Hopes this helps :)

EDIT
Also, it might be a good practice to use the framework instead of writing queries that are specific for a single, or a group, of databases. Say that you for some reason decides to shift to another database. Instead of rewriting every queries (and also finding them first), the framework will "automatically" do that (if set up to so - you should tell what type of database you use)

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