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Recently our team want to build up our own query language, but we have a problem about regexp

If we have a query below

select A where B skip C limit D

the keyword "where", "skip" and "limit" can have 1 or 0 which means we also can have a query like

select A where B skip C
select A skip C limit D
select A limit D

and the point is that we were wondering if it is possible to define a "single" regexp that can match this query and capture A, B, C and D?

here is how we do for now...

dql_parser.parse = function(str) {
var reg_arr = []
if(str.toLowerCase().indexOf('select') !== -1) {
    var reg = new RegExp(/select\s+(.*?)(limit|where|skip)/i)
    var exe = reg.exec(str)
    if(exe !== null) {
        reg_arr.push('fields=' + exe[1])
    }else {
        var reg = new RegExp(/select\s+(.*)?/i)
        var exe = reg.exec(str)
        reg_arr.push('fields=' + exe[1])
    }
}



if(str.toLowerCase().indexOf('where') !== -1) {
    var reg = new RegExp(/where\s+(.*?)(select|limit|skip)/i)
    var exe = reg.exec(str)
    if(exe !== null) {
        reg_arr.push('selector=' + exe[1])
    }else {
        var reg = new RegExp(/where\s+(.*)?/i)
        var exe = reg.exec(str)
        reg_arr.push('selector=' + exe[1])
    }
}

if(str.toLowerCase().indexOf('skip') !== -1) {
    var reg = new RegExp(/skip\s+(.*?)(select|limit|where)/i)
    var exe = reg.exec(str)
    if(exe !== null) {
        reg_arr.push('skip=' + exe[1])
    }else {
        var reg = new RegExp(/skip\s+(.*)?/i)
        var exe = reg.exec(str)
        reg_arr.push('skip=' + exe[1])
    }
}

if(str.toLowerCase().indexOf('limit') !== -1){
    var reg = new RegExp(/limit\s+(.*?)(select|where|skip)/i)
    var exe = reg.exec(str)
    if(exe !== null) {
        reg_arr.push('limit=' + exe[1])
    }else {
        var reg = new RegExp(/limit\s+(.*)?/i)
        var exe = reg.exec(str)
        reg_arr.push('limit=' + exe[1])
    }

}

return reg_arr;

}

Any suggestion is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
So let me get this right you want to write a parser in Javascript? Do you hate yourself so much that you want to endure that pain? –  Ed Heal Feb 22 at 17:24
    
Many people consider regex less readable than explicit parsing. Are you sure you want to shorten your code? –  Jan Dvorak Feb 22 at 17:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not a direct answer to your question, but it might help.

I suggest you to use PEG: a parser generator. You'll define your language in something that looks like BNF, and then it will generate a parser for you.

It's a very reliable tool, far more powerfull than regexp, and very easy too use, especially for simple DSL like your.

share|improve this answer

Long answer short :

You want to "Design your own querying language" and decided to parse it using RegEx???

Well... NO.

Writing a 'real' parser is the only way to do it, and if you're not up for the challenge, maybe you should just quit the idea whatsoever.

If you really want to do it, then start by studying Flex and Bison (Lex/Yacc, I honestly don't know what they call them any more). That's the real deal (at least that's my prefered... toolkit for the job, and if you "invest" in it, it'll definitely pay in the long run.)

Good luck! ;-)

share|improve this answer

But if you really, really want such a misery on your days:

(select\s+(\w*))\s+(where\s+(\w*))?\s*(skip\s+(\w*))?\s*(limit\s+(\w*))?

will give you A, B C and D. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Don't get me wrong: If you go any further that just parsing this simple kind of line, regexp is fine with me. But I agrre qith the other in that "designing your own language" with regexp is definitely a bad idea. In this case I would go with PEG too. –  user1390405 Mar 13 at 15:33

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