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I got this warnings on excuting the line :

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

GtkWarning: IA__gtk_widget_set_size_request: assertion `GTK_IS_WIDGET (widget)' failed

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

GtkWarning: IA__gtk_container_add: assertion `GTK_IS_CONTAINER (container)' failed

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

GtkWarning: IA__gdk_window_get_width: assertion `GDK_IS_WINDOW (window)' failed

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

GtkWarning: IA__gdk_window_get_height: assertion `GDK_IS_WINDOW (window)' failed

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

GtkWarning: IA__gtk_widget_reparent: assertion `widget->parent != NULL' failed

self.builder.add_from_file(self.glade_file)

All articles on the web talking about warnings similar to them had missed one step, which I need it seriously.

Where is the error?? my glade file contain over 200 of objects,How to detect the exact object of warning to correct it ?? Which line is the source of this warnings?

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I would guess the problem is not in the builder file but the code. Just a hunch: are you destroying the widgets at some point (maybe destroying a window when it's closed)? Can you show context to why add_from_file() is used (instead of the normal new_from_file() constructor)? –  jku Feb 23 at 9:11
    
Yes, the window is destroyed when it closed. but the warining occurs on the startup of the code (more early) –  esnadr Feb 23 at 10:49
    
I will try new_from_file(). –  esnadr Feb 23 at 10:52
1  
Feedback: self.builder.new_from_file(self.glade_file) >>> AttributeError: 'gtk.Builder' object has no attribute 'new_from_file'||| the first lines in the code are : > #!/usr/bin/python >import pygtk >pygtk.require('2.0') >import gtk >import gtk.glade –  esnadr Feb 23 at 11:04
    
It seems my comment was not relevant for legacy GTK: Builder.new_from_file() is fairly recent. Sorry for misleading. –  jku Feb 23 at 13:11

1 Answer 1

For C code, you define G_DEBUG=fatal-warnings, and use a debugger to check what makes it break. Not sure what is the pythonic way, though…

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thanks for the hint, I have tried : gdb run mainwin.py --env G_DEBUG=fatal-warnings with no changes. –  esnadr Feb 24 at 15:45
    
Well, it should now abort at the first warning, isn't that the case? Then try an export G_DEBUG=fatal-warnings before calling your program… –  liberforce Feb 24 at 16:28
    
It doesn't abort at all. –  esnadr Feb 24 at 22:24

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