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If a variable points to a null reference in memory, then Java Garbage Collection will deallocate the memory, when it runs (which is nearly never known.)

Thus, is it more efficient to point an object to a null reference when you're done using it in a method, or is it better to have one allocation as a class variable?

For example, is it better to do this:

private TestFile TestFile = new TestFile();
public class Configuration{

//Methods accesing 'TestFile'
    }
}

or

public class Configuration{

public void getFileName(){
TestFile TestFile = new TestFile();
TestFile.getName();
TestFile = null;
}

public void setFileName(String name){
TestFile TestFile = new TestFile();
TestFile.setName(name);
TestFile = null;
}
    }
}

I'm not sure if, for the second example, you have to restate the constructor in each method, but my reasoning is that if the constructor variable points to null, and is removed, there's a high change for a NullPointerException to be thrown almost always (again, GC is extremely sophisticated, and nearly impossible to predict.)

Lastly, I would NOT ever want to run the GC method, from my understanding, as it can mess up the schedule that GC has set, as well as cost more performance to run the method, than the resources it's collecting prematurely would.

Thanks for the help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, you should not set variables to null to "help garbage collector". Modern compilers and JVMs are smart enough to detect that a local variable is unused without you setting it explicitly, so the only thing the null assignment does is making your program less readable.

As far as memory allocations go, if you can avoid unnecessary allocations without making your code more complex, go for it. Otherwise, don't bother optimizing your allocations prematurely - chances are, they are not going to be on the critical path, in which case you do not need to optimize them at all.

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"If an object points to a null reference in memory" -- this makes no sense. An object points to nothing. A variable does the pointing, and if it refers to null, then there's nothing to GC. You seem to be confusing variables with objects, and your second example makes little sense.

The general rules to follow include -- create your objects in the most limited scope necessary. This way, when the variables go out of scope, if the object is not referred to by any other variable, it should be GC'd when necessary.

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These two classes do not do the same thing.

The first does what you'd expect.

The second one, each time you call setFileName or getFileName, creates a new TestFile, with a blank/null/default filename. It does not remember the last filename that was set.

new TestFile() is like TestFile.createNewTestFile() (if that method existed) - each time it runs, it creates a new TestFile. There is a huge difference in meaning between calling it once and using the same TestFile, and calling it every time you want to do something with a TestFile.

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