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for m in $count
  do
        `cat $op ${arr[$m]} > $op1`
        `rm -f $op`
        `touch $op`
        `cat $op1 ${arr[$m+1]} > $op`
        if [ $m ge $count ]; then
        `rm -f $op1`
        `touch $op1`
        fi
        m=$((m+1))
  done

I wanted to continuously loop from the start count 2 till the end count 10 . The $count=10 here. But the above piece of code executes the for loop only once.

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3  
Do you really have that many backquotes in your script, or was that an attempt to get the code looking like code? To get code, write it as you'd like to see it, then select it, and use the {} button above the edit box — but you've been around long enough you should know that. The code as written will 'work', but only because Unix commands are silent on success and all the commands will generate no standard output, so the backticks execute an empty command, but that's plain perverse as a way of writing shell. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 23 at 5:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rainy sunday - having much free time - long answer ;)

Many issues with your script, some recommended solutions. Because you used the construction m=$((m+1)) - will be using bash as "shell". (Consider adding the bash tag)

For the cycle - several possibilities

count=10
m=2                           #start with 2
while (( $m <= $count ))      #while m is less or equal to 10
do                            #do
        echo $m               #this action
        let m++               #increment m (add one to m)
done                          #end of while

or, if the count is a constant (not a variable), you can write

for m in {2..10}    #REMEMBER, will not works with a variables, like  {2..$count}
do
    echo "$m"
done

another variant - using the seq (man seq) command for counting

for m in $(seq 2 ${count:=10})  # ${count:=10} - defaults the $count to 10 if it is undefined
do
    echo $m
done

or C-like for loop

let count=10
for ((m=2; m<=count; m++))
do
        echo $m
done

All 4 loops produces:

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

so, having a right cycle now. Now add your specific actions.

The:

rm -f $op
touch $op

can be replaced by one command

echo -n > $op  #echo nothing and write the "nothing" into the file

it is faster, because the echo is an bash builtin (doesn't start two external commands)

So your actions could looks like

cat $op ${arr[$m]} > $op1
echo -n > $op
cat $op1 ${arr[$m+1]} > $op

in this case, the echo is useless, because the second cat will write its output to the $op anyway (and before write shortens the file to zero size), so this result is identical with the above

cat $op ${arr[$m]} > $op1
cat $op1 ${arr[$m+1]} > $op      

Those two cat commands can be shorted to one, using bash's >> append to file redirection

cat ${arr[$m]} ${arr[m+1]} >> $op

The whole script could look like the next

#making a testing environment

for f in $(seq 12)               #create 12 files opdata-N 
do
    arr[$f]="opdata-$f"          #store the filenames in the array "arr"
    echo "data-$f" > ${arr[$f]}  #each file contains one line "data-N"
done
#echo ${arr[@]}

#setting the $op and $op1 filenames
#consider choosing more descriptive variable names
op="file_op"
#op1="file_op1"   #not needed

#add some initial (old) value to $op
echo "initial value" > $op
#end of creating the testing environment

#the script
count=10
for m in $(seq 2 $count)
do
    cat ${arr[$m]} ${arr[m+1]} >> $op   
done

at the end, file $op will contain:

initial value
data-2
data-3
data-3
data-4
data-4
data-5
data-5
data-6
data-6
data-7
data-7
data-8
data-8
data-9
data-9
data-10
data-10
data-11

BTW, are you sure about the result? Because if only want add file-2 .. file-10 to the end of $op (without duplicating entries), you can simple write:

cat file-{2..10} >> $op    #the '>>' adds to the end of file...

or by using your array:

startpos=2
count=10
cat ${arr[@]:$startpos:$count} >> $op   

Ufff.. ;)

Ps: usually it is good practice to enclose variables in double quotes like "$filename" - in the above examples for better readability I omitted them.

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Very useful answer. I would upvote twice if I could. Productive use of a Sunday! –  Floris Feb 23 at 12:29
    
Very Useful one. Thanks :-) –  Angus Feb 23 at 18:51
    
Nicely done; a shorter and possibly more portable alternative to echo -n > $op is to use the : builtin : > $op. –  mklement0 Feb 23 at 18:59

Any loop needs a "condition to keep looping". When you use a

for m in count

type of loop, the condition is "if there are more elements in the collection count, pick the next one and keep going". This doesn't seem to be what you want. You are looking for the bash equivalent of

for(m = 0; m < 10; m++)

I think. The best way to do this is - with exactly that kind of loop (but note - an extra pair of parentheses, and a semicolon):

#!/bin/bash
# Display message 5 times
for ((i = 0 ; i < 5 ; i++)); do
  echo "Welcome $i times."
done

see nix craft for original

I think you can extend this to your situation… if I understood your question correctly you need something like this:

for ((m = 2; m <= 10; m++))
  do
    cat $op ${arr[$m]} > $op1
    rm -f $op
    touch $op
    cat $op1 ${arr[$m+1]} > $op
    if [ $m ge $count ]; then
      rm -f $op1
      touch $op1
    fi
  done
share|improve this answer
    
That worked great. Thanks for explaining –  Angus Feb 23 at 12:14

Use a while loop instead.

The for loop is when you have multiple objects to iterate against. You have only one, i.e. $count.

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