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How come a properly declared global variable can't be deleted?

I don't know if this is across all program languages, but I know that in JavaScript it can't be deleted.

Source: Javascript the Definitive Guide O'Reilly.

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1  
Because it's just the way it is. –  Sergio Tulentsev Feb 23 at 7:23
2  
You can set the variable to undefined –  elclanrs Feb 23 at 7:24
    
    
    
In the first link you posted Sergio. Noah's first code is: (function() { var foo = 123; delete foo; // wont do anything, foo is still 123 var bar = { foo: 123 }; delete bar.foo; // foo is gone }()); would that mean 123 is also deleted since foo was its variable? –  user3223207 Feb 23 at 7:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you use global variables and you want to be able to delete them, you should easily define them in a global object, without using var in your statement, like:

let's say you want to define a global varible in your code, and you need to be able to delete them whenever you want, so if you do:

function myfunc(){
    var name = "Robert";
    console.log(delete name);
}

and call it in your console you would have, false as the result of delete statement, which means it has not got deleted, but if you do it like:

function myfunc(){
    var obj = {};
    obj.name = "Robert";
    console.log(delete obj.name);
}

then your result would be true, which means it gets deleted now.

now for global object if you create it like:

window.myobj = {};

then you can delete it and it actually get deleted:

delete window.myobj;

or

delete window["myobj"];

The thing is when you create your variable using var, in the window context, although it is on object in the window, but it doesn't get deleted, for instance if you do:

var myobj = {};

in the browser dev console, it gets defined in the window, and you can have it like:

window.myobj

but you can not delete it, because you have defined it in a var statement.

But do not forget to set it to null, if you really want it to get deleted from memory:

window["myobj"] = null;
delete window["myobj"];
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Aw okay makes sense! Thank you! –  user3223207 Feb 23 at 7:43

When variable is created in global scope then automatically DontDelete property is added to the variable and set to the true. That is the reason global variables (or functions too) can not be deleted.

For other variables that property is false so those can be deleted.

For more clarity you can refer the article : understanding delete

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As was stated in this answer by user Eric Leschinski

Delete a variable in JavaScript:

Summary:

The reason you are having trouble deleting your variable in JavaScript is because JavaScript won't let you. You can't delete anything created by the var command unless we pull a rabbit out our bag of tricks.

The delete command is only for object's properties which were not created with var.

JavaScript will let you delete a variable created with var under the following conditions:

  1. You are using a javascript interpreter or commandline.

  2. You are using eval and you create and delete your var inside there.

or you can set null to an variable which will behave like a deleted object

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5  
Where is this copy/pasted from? Please give proper attribution. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 23 at 7:32
    
In other words in order to delete it you need to do this, example lets say we want to get rid of 'foo' global var. Example: var bar = { foo:123}; delete bar.foo; //which will delete the variable foo right? It's kind of hard to communicate code via text... in person so much easier. –  user3223207 Feb 23 at 7:41
    
use this source link :) –  Atal Shrivastava Feb 24 at 4:22

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