Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does python built-in function int() still try to convert the submitted value even if the value is already of int type?

More concisely: is there any performance difference between int('42') and int(42) caused by conversion algorithm?

Attempted to find the source code for this built-in, but failed.

share|improve this question
4  
Explain your downvote –  vaultah Feb 23 at 9:39
    
int literal is actually a string without quotes. This conversion is done during compilation (that is during first processing of the source code). The Python's int object must be constructed in both cases. As Python does not use a machine int the complexity should be similar in both cases. –  pepr Jun 8 at 19:42
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As per the comments in the source code,

Convert a number or string to an integer, or return 0 if no arguments are given. If x is a number, return x.__int__(). For floating point numbers, this truncates towards zero.

If x is not a number or if base is given, then x must be a string, bytes, or bytearray instance representing an integer literal in the given base

So, if the input is a number, __int__ function will be called on that object and the result will be returned. Internally nb_int is an item in PyNumberMethods structure, which corresponds to the __int__ function. As per the latest source code at the time of this writing, long_long is the function which corresponds to the nb_int function, which is defined like this

long_long(PyObject *v)
{
    if (PyLong_CheckExact(v))
        Py_INCREF(v);
    else
        v = _PyLong_Copy((PyLongObject *)v);
    return v;
}

Here PyLong_checkExact is a Macro, which just checks if the current object is really of type long. If it is true, it simply increases the reference count and returns the object as it is, nothing extra is done.

If the input is in the form of a string, the string has to be converted to a number with PyLong_FromUnicodeObject function.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the most thorough answer. Accepted. –  vaultah Feb 23 at 11:28
add comment

This is handled in function long_long in Objects/longobject.c, as explained in more detail by thefourtheye:

static PyObject *
long_long(PyObject *v)
{
    if (PyLong_CheckExact(v))
        Py_INCREF(v);
    else
        v = _PyLong_Copy((PyLongObject *)v);
    return v;
}

So, when the argument is already an int, the reference count is incremented and the same object returned.

You can assume similar behavior for immutable types in general,. For example, tuple(mytuple) returns a new reference to mytuple, while, by contrast, list(mylist) creates a copy of mylist.

share|improve this answer
    
Though this is almost similar to the actual function, this is in fact an internal helper function. –  thefourtheye Feb 23 at 11:01
    
@thefourtheye You are right, edited. –  Janne Karila Feb 23 at 13:31
    
Clear and detailed, +1 :) –  zx81 Jun 9 at 9:16
add comment

If you pass an int object to int(), you get the same object back (CPython 3.3.2):

>>> a = 1000 * 1000 # large enough to avoid interning
>>> b = int(a)
>>> a is b
True

I don't know what you mean by "algorithmic performance difference", but it doesn't create a new object.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, "algorithmic performance difference" wasn't clear. Fixed it. Your answer sure is helpful, but Janne Karila's one contains the reference to the source code, so I'll accept it. Sorry :( –  vaultah Feb 23 at 10:17
    
No need to apologise, that is the better answer –  jonrsharpe Feb 23 at 10:19
add comment

Why don't you just compare both?

>>> def f(): int('42')
... 
>>> def g(): int(42)
... 
>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit(f)
0.3384080480027478
>>> timeit(g)
0.2566616949989111
share|improve this answer
    
I did, but I'd still like to know the logic of this function. That's why I've asked the question. –  vaultah Feb 23 at 9:34
2  
@Crystal Which will depend on the implementation you are using or your end-user will use. –  Hyperboreus Feb 23 at 9:36
    
Well, I'm talking about the canonical one (CPython) –  vaultah Feb 23 at 9:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.