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I'm making a project where I need to create a class instance which has methods which connect to a db and fetch data from it (I'm using SQLite as a backend). I've had some experience with flask-sqlalchemy, but I'm lost when it comes to pure SQLAlchemy. The concept is as follows: User creates an instance of DataSet, and passes a path to the database as an __init__ parameter. If the database already exists, I would like just to connect to it and do queries, if it doesn't, I want to create a new one using a model. But I can't understand how to do so.

Here's the DataSet code:

from os.path import normcase, split, join, isfile
from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker
import errors
import trainset
import testset


class DataSet:
    def __init__(self, path_to_set, path_to_db, train_set=False, path_to_labels=None, label_dict=None,
                 custom_name=None):
        self.__path_to_set = path_to_set
        self.__label_dict = label_dict

        if custom_name is None:
            dbpath = join(path_to_db, 'train.db')
            if train_set is False:
                dbpath = join(path_to_db, 'test.db')
        else:
            dbpath = join(path_to_db, custom_name)
        if isfile(dbpath):
            self.__prepopulated = True
        else:
            self.__prepopulated = False
        self.__dbpath = dbpath

        if train_set is True and path_to_labels is None:
            raise errors.InsufficientData('labels', 'specified')
        if train_set is True and not isfile(path_to_labels):
            raise errors.InsufficientData('labels', 'found at specified path', path_to_labels)

    def prepopulate(self):
        engine = create_engine('sqlite:////' + self.__dbpath)
        self.__prepopulated = True

Here's the trainset code:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy import Column, String, PickleType, Integer, MetaData

Base = declarative_base()
metadata = MetaData()


class TrainSet(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'train set'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    real_id = Column(String(60))
    path = Column(String(120))
    labels = Column(PickleType)
    features = Column(PickleType)

Here's the testset code:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy import Column, String, PickleType, Integer, MetaData

Base = declarative_base()
metadata = MetaData()


class TestSet(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'test set'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    real_id = Column(String(60))
    path = Column(String(120))
    features = Column(PickleType)

So, if the user passes train_set=True when creating a DataSet instance, I would like to create a database using the TrainSet model, and create a TestSet database otherwise. I would like this to happen in the prepopulate method, however, I don't understand how to do it - the documentation calls for this: Base.metadata.create_all(engine), but I'm lost as to where to put this code.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

First save the parameter train_set:

class DataSet:
    def __init__(self, path_to_set, path_to_db, train_set=False, path_to_labels=None, label_dict=None,
                 custom_name=None):
        self._train_set = train_set
        # ...

Then, use it in the prepopulate to create proper model(s):

def prepopulate(self):
    engine = create_engine('sqlite:////' + self.__dbpath)
    if self._train_set:
        trainset.Base.create_all(engine)
    else:
        testset.Base.create_all(engine)
    self.__prepopulated = True

One more thing: do not prefix your "private" variables with double-underscore. Please read PEP 8 -- Style Guide for Python Code for reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks! I only had to change testset.Base.create_all(engine) to testset.Base.metadata.create_all(engine) (same goes for train set), but it all works now. Also, since I will be writing a lot of functions which query stuff, is it a good idea to store the engine in the class instance? (Instead of creating it in each class method)? – George Oblapenko Feb 23 '14 at 18:29
1  
I would not store engine in any of the model classes, as you will be mixing wrong things together and will get everything coupled in a wierd way (model should not know anything about the connection). Instead, in the class methods just use object_session(self) to get the session (a-la transaction) and query other data as required. – van Feb 23 '14 at 21:21

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