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I have an ArrayList containing int[].

Assuming Arrays.equals(int[], (a value in the arrayList)) = true

why when I do arrayOfInts.contains(int[]) is this false?

I assume it is because of the same reason that (int[] == (a value in the arrayList)) = false but should I be getting this error?

Can I correct it somehow?

TL;DR: Can I use Arraylist.contains() for int[]


EDIT:

ANSWER (if anyone searches this in the future here's the comparison code I made as a solution):

private boolean arraylistContains(int[] comparison, ArrayList<int[]> arrayListToCompare){
    for(int[] values: arrayListToCompare){
        if (Arrays.equals(comparison, values)){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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1  
Can you show some valid code samples, preferably those you are actually testing your code with? What is int[]1 supposed to do? –  Jeroen Vannevel Feb 23 at 14:50
1  
Is it Java? Just wondering why the strange syntax... –  Trein Feb 23 at 14:50
    
Fixed the syntax. "int[]1" was meant to indicate that it was not just int[] but a value in int. Apologies for the confusion. –  deadfire19 Feb 23 at 14:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A list of arrays stores only the references to the arrays, not their content, therefore contains() is only able to say, if the list contains the exact reference to the array you input. It doesn't evaluate the contents of the array.

If you need to check, if the list contains an array with specific values, you will have to iterate over the list and use Arrays.equals(arr1, arr2).

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Just made a function for it. Thanks. Thought there might be an inbuilt method. –  deadfire19 Feb 23 at 14:54

You cannot, unfortunately. I would probably wrap the array in another object and put that in the list instead. Something like (totally untested):

public class IntArrayWrapper {
    private final int[] intArray;
    public IntArrayWrapper(int[] intArray) {
        this.intArray = intArray;
    }
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return Arrays.hashCode(intArray);
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        return other instanceof IntArrayWrapper && Arrays.equals(this.intArray, ((IntArrayWrapper) other).intArray);
    }
}

Then, if you decide in the future to replace your ArrayList with a HashSet, for example, it will be simple (and you might get some nice performance gains).

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REFER -> http://stackoverflow.com/a/106351/1897935

ArrayList<Object> list = ...;
for (Object o : list) {
        if (o.getClass().equals(Integer.TYPE)) {
            handleInt((int)o);
        }
        else if (o.getClass().equals(String.class)) {
            handleString((String)o);
        }
        ...
    }
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You cannot because

    int[] a = { 1,2,3 };
    int[] b = { 1,2,3 };
    List<int[]> list = new ArrayList<int[]>();
    list.add(a);
    list.contains(b); // is false

a is not equal b, it means a.equals(b) will return false. Method Collection.contans(Object) is using equals to check if an abject is already in a collections. So if a.equals(b) is false you get that the array is not in the collection even if they looks the same.

There is an exception. If they are really the same object contains will return true. See below:

    int[] a = { 1,2,3 };
    List<int[]> list = new ArrayList<int[]>();
    list.add(a);
    list.contains(a); // is true
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1  
Can you clarify this? Any new user who sees your post will not know what you're trying to say since they look the same. –  Jeroen Vannevel Feb 23 at 14:55
    
Look at java.util.AbstractCollection method contains. –  user3329098 Feb 23 at 15:03

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