Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Many attempts have been made in the past to add timeout functionality in Python such that when a specified time limit expired, waiting code could move on. Unfortunately, previous recipes either allowed the running function to continue running and consuming resources or else killed the function using a platform-specific method of thread termination. The purpose of this wiki is to develop a cross-platform answer to this problem that many programmers have had to tackle for various programming projects.

#! /usr/bin/env python
"""Provide way to add timeout specifications to arbitrary functions.

There are many ways to add a timeout to a function, but no solution
is both cross-platform and capable of terminating the procedure. This
module use the multiprocessing module to solve both of those problems."""

################################################################################

__author__ = 'Stephen "Zero" Chappell <Noctis.Skytower@gmail.com>'
__date__ = '11 February 2010'
__version__ = '$Revision: 3 $'

################################################################################

import inspect
import sys
import time
import multiprocessing

################################################################################

def add_timeout(function, limit=60):
    """Add a timeout parameter to a function and return it.

    It is illegal to pass anything other than a function as the first
    parameter. If the limit is not given, it gets a default value equal
    to one minute. The function is wrapped and returned to the caller."""
    assert inspect.isfunction(function)
    if limit <= 0:
        raise ValueError()
    return _Timeout(function, limit)

class NotReadyError(Exception): pass

################################################################################

def _target(queue, function, *args, **kwargs):
    """Run a function with arguments and return output via a queue.

    This is a helper function for the Process created in _Timeout. It runs
    the function with positional arguments and keyword arguments and then
    returns the function's output by way of a queue. If an exception gets
    raised, it is returned to _Timeout to be raised by the value property."""
    try:
        queue.put((True, function(*args, **kwargs)))
    except:
        queue.put((False, sys.exc_info()[1]))

class _Timeout:

    """Wrap a function and add a timeout (limit) attribute to it.

    Instances of this class are automatically generated by the add_timeout
    function defined above. Wrapping a function allows asynchronous calls
    to be made and termination of execution after a timeout has passed."""

    def __init__(self, function, limit):
        """Initialize instance in preparation for being called."""
        self.__limit = limit
        self.__function = function
        self.__timeout = time.clock()
        self.__process = multiprocessing.Process()
        self.__queue = multiprocessing.Queue()

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        """Execute the embedded function object asynchronously.

        The function given to the constructor is transparently called and
        requires that "ready" be intermittently polled. If and when it is
        True, the "value" property may then be checked for returned data."""
        self.cancel()
        self.__queue = multiprocessing.Queue(1)
        args = (self.__queue, self.__function) + args
        self.__process = multiprocessing.Process(target=_target,
                                                 args=args,
                                                 kwargs=kwargs)
        self.__process.daemon = True
        self.__process.start()
        self.__timeout = self.__limit + time.clock()

    def cancel(self):
        """Terminate any possible execution of the embedded function."""
        if self.__process.is_alive():
            self.__process.terminate()

    @property
    def ready(self):
        """Read-only property indicating status of "value" property."""
        if self.__queue.full():
            return True
        elif not self.__queue.empty():
            return True
        elif self.__timeout < time.clock():
            self.cancel()
        else:
            return False

    @property
    def value(self):
        """Read-only property containing data returned from function."""
        if self.ready is True:
            flag, load = self.__queue.get()
            if flag:
                return load
            raise load
        raise NotReadyError()

    def __get_limit(self):
        return self.__limit

    def __set_limit(self, value):
        if value <= 0:
            raise ValueError()
        self.__limit = value

    limit = property(__get_limit, __set_limit,
                     doc="Property for controlling the value of the timeout.")

Edit: This code was written for Python 3.x and was not designed for class methods as a decoration. The multiprocessing module was not designed to modify class instances across the process boundaries.

share|improve this question
    
That exception handling only works in Python 3. In 2.x, it'll throw away the original stack trace, show the exception as originating on the "raise", and the assert won't show up in the stack trace at all. –  Glenn Maynard Feb 4 '10 at 9:20
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From January 25 to February 10, I have been working on a program called VerseMatch. The timeout module was developed to solve a corner-case problem that would require forcefully shutting a function down. As a result, a Bible Verse Quiz program has been completed that uses the timeout module.

Click here to see the eleven modules written for the VerseMatch program. It demonstrates its usage.

share|improve this answer
    
Page not found. –  Vojtech R. Apr 2 '10 at 12:23
    
it doesn't seem to work. Unless I am hugely mistaken... I added your 'decorator' to a small function and gave it a limit of 3 seconds. Then I waited for a while... if this does in fact work, please post a small example... –  Sheena Feb 11 '13 at 9:49
    
@Sheena: Did you poll the object after creating it? The results are deferred, so after you call your wrapped function, you have to check its attributes for the results. –  Noctis Skytower Feb 11 '13 at 19:00
    
@NoctisSkytowe: Now I see, thanks. I assumed the polling would be worked into the decorator function. It would be pretty simple to make a decorator @timeout(s) that would cause a function to raise an exception if s seconds have elapsed, then the use of your module will be a lot more intuitive and need much less boiler-plate code... I would be interested if there is a reason you did it this way. I can't think of a reason but I'm not sure exactly what you were trying to achieve. If you want I'll post what I mean as an answer. –  Sheena Feb 12 '13 at 7:42
    
@Sheena: It was written that way because of the project it was written for. The functions would be run in a servlet, and the client page would refresh every few seconds (causing the state of the functions to be queried). The page would reload with status information gathered from the functions. You might want to check out the original program to see how it worked. –  Noctis Skytower Feb 12 '13 at 15:36
show 1 more comment

The principal problem with your code is the overuse of the double underscore namespace conflict preventer in a class that isn't intended to be subclassed at all.

In general, self.__foo is a code smell that should be accompanied by a comment along the lines of # This is a mixin and we don't want arbitrary subclasses to have a namespace conflict.

Further the client API of this method would look like this:

def mymethod(): pass

mymethod = add_timeout(mymethod, 15)

# start the processing    
timeoutobj = mymethod()
try:
    # access the property, which is really a function call
    ret = timeoutobj.value
except TimeoutError:
    # handle a timeout here
    ret = None

This is not very pythonic at all and a better client api would be:

@timeout(15)
def mymethod(): pass

try:
    mymethod()
except TimeoutError:
    pass

You are using @property in your class for something that is a state mutating accessor, this is not a good idea. For instance, what would happen when .value is accessed twice? It looks like it would fail because queue.get() would return trash because the queue is already empty.

Remove @property entirely. Don't use it in this context, it's not suitable for your use-case. Make call block when called and return the value or raise the exception itself. If you really must have value accessed later, make it a method like .get() or .value().

This code for the _target should be rewritten a little:

def _target(queue, function, *args, **kwargs):
    try:
        queue.put((True, function(*args, **kwargs)))
    except:
        queue.put((False, exc_info())) # get *all* the exec info, don't do exc_info[1]

# then later:
    raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]

That way the stack trace will be preserved correctly and visible to the programmer.

I think you've made a reasonable first crack at writing a useful library, I like the usage of the processing module to achieve the goals.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the double underscore not the only way to approach making a private variable in Python? Private variables are preferred in real object oriented programming as this is how encapsulation works, yeah? –  BillR May 10 '13 at 19:09
add comment

This is how to get the decorator syntax Jerub mentioned

def timeout(limit=None):
    if limit is None:
        limit = DEFAULT_TIMEOUT
    if limit <= 0:
        raise TimeoutError() # why not ValueError here?
    def wrap(function):
        return _Timeout(function,limit)
    return wrap

@timeout(15)
def mymethod(): pass
share|improve this answer
    
I have used decorator syntax before but would not recommend it in this case. –  Noctis Skytower Feb 12 '10 at 17:58
    
@NoctisSkytower why would you not recommend a decorator in this case? What do you feel is the disadvantage or risk? –  tristan Oct 28 '13 at 19:19
    
@tristan: Most decorated code involves methods in classes. Based on how multiprocessing works in this example, any changes that happen in the decorated code would not be reflected in the original object. All changes stay in the second process the add_timeout function ends up creating. –  Noctis Skytower Oct 29 '13 at 0:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.