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I have Vehicles different types of Fuels (petrolium, helium, electricity...) to charge them with. Apparently petrolium and electricity have different units. I am going to process different fuels in a similar manner with a FuelingStation in future. How to store the Fuel info?

Object Fuel with amount and units? Object of type FuelType and a float fuelAmount inside a Vehicle class?

I undersand, It is a broad question, but what are the general suggestions?

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2  
How do you run a vehicle on helium??? –  Seva Alekseyev Feb 23 '14 at 15:31
1  
Create a Fuel base class, then derived classes for each Fuel type, and virtual methods for the specific calculations. –  OldProgrammer Feb 23 '14 at 15:31
    
Best reference post I found on this topic: What new capabilities do user-defined literals add to C++? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 23 '14 at 15:32
    
@SevaAlekseyev I imagine it's a highly pitched concept. –  Casey Feb 23 '14 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think having different classes for multiple fuel types is not the right solution, because it's not Fuel's responsibility to calculate its consumption, but car's. I believe that instead there should be multiple types of cars, which use different fuel types and implement calculateFuelConsumption() and fillFuel() differently.

For fuel types I believe all is needed is a simple enum and modelling a Fuel class is not necessary until it would be used for storing different fuel specific properties which doesn't seem to be the case here.

Below is what I believe to be a reasonable solution which implements an enum for various fuel types, a static map for retrieving fuel unit names and a factory pattern for creating different types of cars, based on their fuel type:

class Car
{
public:
    enum FuelType
    {
        UNKNOWN_FUEL,
        PETROLEUM_FUEL,
        ELECTRICITY_FUEL,
        HELLIUM_FUEL
    };

    Car();

    FuelType getFuelType() const { return m_fuelType; }
    std::string getFuelUnit(FuelType type) { return m_fuelUnits.at(type); }
    virtual float calculateFuelConsumption(float distance, float speed) const = 0;
    virtual void fill(FuelType fuelType) = 0;

private:
    FuelType m_fuelType;
    static std::map < FuelType, std::string> m_fuelUnits;
};

std::map < Car::FuelType, std::string> Car::m_fuelUnits
{
    { Car::UNKNOWN_FUEL, "unknown" },
    { Car::PETROLEUM_FUEL, "litres" },
    { Car::ELECTRICITY_FUEL, "Ah" },
    { Car::HELLIUM_FUEL, "cubic metres" }
};

class PetrolFueledCar : public Car
{
public:
    // ...
    float calculateFuelConsumption(float distance, float speed) const { /* ... */ }
    void fill(FuelType fuelType)  { /* ... */ } 
};

class HelliumPoweredCar : public Car
{
public:
    // ...
    float calculateFuelConsumption(float distance, float speed) const { /* ... */ }
    void fill(FuelType fuelType)  { /* ... */ }
};

class CarFactory
{
public:
    static unique_ptr<Car> newCar(Car::FuelType fuelType)
    {
        if (fuelType == Car::PETROLEUM_FUEL)
            return new PetrolFueledCar;
        if (fuelType = Car::HELLIUM_FUEL)
            return new HelliumPoweredCar;
        // ...
    }
};
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Thanks a lot, that completely answers my question. –  Сашко Лихенко Feb 24 '14 at 20:42
    
Except for conversion from usual pointer to unique_ptr. –  Сашко Лихенко Feb 26 '14 at 16:47
    
You can use a raw pointer just as well, but you'll have to manually manage it's lifetime. Smart pointers do it for you. –  jaho Feb 26 '14 at 18:27
    
I mean it says "could not convert ‘(operator new(8u), (<statement>, ((PetrolFueledCar*)<anonymous>)))’ from ‘PetrolFueledCar*’ to ‘std::unique_ptr<Car>’" at runtime. The explicit type cast is required. –  Сашко Лихенко Feb 26 '14 at 19:27
    
Ah, use std:unique_ptr<Car>(new PetrolFueledCar); –  jaho Feb 26 '14 at 20:15

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