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This code can't pass compiling. The only difference is the return type. Foo1's return type is the user-defined struct and Foo2's is int.

struct test
{    
};    

test Foo1()  
{  
    return test();  
}  

int Foo2()  
{  
    return 0;  
}  

int main()  
{  
    test& r1 = Foo1(); //ok  
    int& r2 = Foo2(); //no but why? Is it the C++ standard way?  

    return 0;  
}
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7  
For me compiling on g++-4.7 neither line is okay –  Brian Feb 23 '14 at 17:44
    
clang++: error: non-const lvalue reference to type 'test' cannot bind to a temporary of type 'test', same error on both lines. What's your compiler? –  Mat Feb 23 '14 at 17:47
1  
Both lines are wrong: you cannot bind a non-const lvalue reference to a temporary. –  juanchopanza Feb 23 '14 at 17:47
    
Why exactly do you want it to be a reference? What you are trying to do doesn't seem to make sense conceptually. –  Tim Seguine Feb 23 '14 at 17:56
    
MSVC++ can pass "test& r1 = Foo1();" –  user3343811 Feb 24 '14 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to have a reference you can still use a reference to const otherwise neither of the line will compile :

struct test
{
};

test Foo1()
{
    return test();
}

int Foo2()
{
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    const test& r1 = Foo1(); // ok now
    const int& r2 = Foo2();  //ok now

    return 0;
}
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It is either a compiler bug or its "language extension" (for example MS VC++ has many such "language extensions"). In both cases of the function calls the compiler shall issue an error because it may not bind a temporary object to non-const reference.

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