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[I created an imaginary JavaClass just to be able to test the code, see at the end of the question.]

I use an incremental/mutable algorithm from a Java library (Weka, but the question applies to any Java library). I am trying to wrap its mutable nature. One way to do it is like in code below:

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  //just returns the JavaModel to simplify the question.
  lazy val last_state(items: Seq[Item]) = {
    items foreach model.update
    model
  }
}

The problem is that sometimes, some of the intermediary states are also needed. The straight forward way to do this is to keep a copy of each of them:

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  def states(items: Seq[Item]): Stream[JavaModel] =
    if (items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
    else {
      val h = items.head
      val t = items.tail
      val clone = clone(model)      // (AbstractClassifier.makeCopy for weka users)
      clone.update(h)
      clone #:: states(t)
    }
  }
}        

When one needs to get the last result, this is much slower than the first code because of all the unneeded copying. I could put lazy vals inside the stream. But at the time that its evaluation occurs, the instance model is not guaranteed to be the same anymore.

class Lazy (model: JavaModel) {
  lazy val copy = clone(model)     // (AbstractClassifier.makeCopy for weka users)
}

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  def states(items: Seq[Item]): Stream[Lazy] =
    if (items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
    else {
      val h = items.head
      val t = items.tail
      model.update(h)
      Lazy(model) #:: states(t)
    }
  }
}

This ugly solution was the best I found. I has non-private mutable fields, etc.:

class JavaClass(initial:Int = 1) {
  //represents a lot of data structures
  private var state = initial

  //Int represents something more complex
  def update(h: Int) {
    println("Some heavy calculations performed. State=" + state)
    state += 1
  }

  def copy = new JavaClass(state)

  //other methods that make use of the state ...
}

case class Lazy(java_object: JavaClass) {
  var lazy_var: Option[JavaClass] = null

  def copied = if (lazy_var == null) {
    lazy_var = Some(java_object.copy)
    lazy_var
  } else lazy_var
}

class Model {
  def states(items: Seq[Int]): Stream[Lazy] = {
    val java_class = new JavaClass
    def rec(items: Seq[Int], laz: Lazy): Stream[Lazy] =
      if (laz != null && items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
      else {
        if (laz.lazy_var == null) laz.lazy_var = None
        val h = items.head
        val t = items.tail
        java_class.update(h)
        val new_laz = Lazy(java_class)
        new_laz #:: rec(t, new_laz)
      }
    rec(items, Lazy(null))
  }
}

//Test:
scala>     val m = new Model
m: Model = Model@726b80fa

scala>     val states = m.states(Seq(1, 2, 3, 4, 5))
Some heavy calculations performed. State=1
states: Stream[Lazy] = Stream(Lazy(JavaClass@283e1abf), ?)

scala>     states(0).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res31: Any = JavaClass@1029bf49

scala>     states(3).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
Some heavy calculations performed. State=2
Some heavy calculations performed. State=3
Some heavy calculations performed. State=4
res32: Any = JavaClass@3cb40c69

scala>     states(3).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res33: Any = JavaClass@3cb40c69

scala>     states(1).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res34: Any = -1
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1 Answer 1

A good place is to start from "artificial fields" using "_=" posfix as explained in the example from this site. Maybe it is better to open a new question with correct camelCase names.

  // Fields may be artificial:
  class H {
    private var realX = 0

    def x = realX

    // called for "this.x = <value>":
    def x_=(newX : Int) {
      this.realX = newX
    }
  }
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