Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

[I created an imaginary JavaClass just to be able to test the code, see at the end of the question.]

I use an incremental/mutable algorithm from a Java library (Weka, but the question applies to any Java library). I am trying to wrap its mutable nature. One way to do it is like in code below:

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  //just returns the JavaModel to simplify the question.
  lazy val last_state(items: Seq[Item]) = {
    items foreach model.update
    model
  }
}

The problem is that sometimes, some of the intermediary states are also needed. The straight forward way to do this is to keep a copy of each of them:

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  def states(items: Seq[Item]): Stream[JavaModel] =
    if (items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
    else {
      val h = items.head
      val t = items.tail
      val clone = clone(model)      // (AbstractClassifier.makeCopy for weka users)
      clone.update(h)
      clone #:: states(t)
    }
  }
}        

When one needs to get the last result, this is much slower than the first code because of all the unneeded copying. I could put lazy vals inside the stream. But at the time that its evaluation occurs, the instance model is not guaranteed to be the same anymore.

class Lazy (model: JavaModel) {
  lazy val copy = clone(model)     // (AbstractClassifier.makeCopy for weka users)
}

class Model {
  private val model = new JavaModel //just a fake example (could be NaiveBayes)

  def states(items: Seq[Item]): Stream[Lazy] =
    if (items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
    else {
      val h = items.head
      val t = items.tail
      model.update(h)
      Lazy(model) #:: states(t)
    }
  }
}

This ugly solution was the best I found. I has non-private mutable fields, etc.:

class JavaClass(initial:Int = 1) {
  //represents a lot of data structures
  private var state = initial

  //Int represents something more complex
  def update(h: Int) {
    println("Some heavy calculations performed. State=" + state)
    state += 1
  }

  def copy = new JavaClass(state)

  //other methods that make use of the state ...
}

case class Lazy(java_object: JavaClass) {
  var lazy_var: Option[JavaClass] = null

  def copied = if (lazy_var == null) {
    lazy_var = Some(java_object.copy)
    lazy_var
  } else lazy_var
}

class Model {
  def states(items: Seq[Int]): Stream[Lazy] = {
    val java_class = new JavaClass
    def rec(items: Seq[Int], laz: Lazy): Stream[Lazy] =
      if (laz != null && items.isEmpty) Stream.Empty
      else {
        if (laz.lazy_var == null) laz.lazy_var = None
        val h = items.head
        val t = items.tail
        java_class.update(h)
        val new_laz = Lazy(java_class)
        new_laz #:: rec(t, new_laz)
      }
    rec(items, Lazy(null))
  }
}

//Test:
scala>     val m = new Model
m: Model = Model@726b80fa

scala>     val states = m.states(Seq(1, 2, 3, 4, 5))
Some heavy calculations performed. State=1
states: Stream[Lazy] = Stream(Lazy(JavaClass@283e1abf), ?)

scala>     states(0).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res31: Any = JavaClass@1029bf49

scala>     states(3).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
Some heavy calculations performed. State=2
Some heavy calculations performed. State=3
Some heavy calculations performed. State=4
res32: Any = JavaClass@3cb40c69

scala>     states(3).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res33: Any = JavaClass@3cb40c69

scala>     states(1).copied match {case Some(x) => x; case None => -1}
res34: Any = -1
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

A good place is to start from "artificial fields" using "_=" posfix as explained in the example from this site. Maybe it is better to open a new question with correct camelCase names.

  // Fields may be artificial:
  class H {
    private var realX = 0

    def x = realX

    // called for "this.x = <value>":
    def x_=(newX : Int) {
      this.realX = newX
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.