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I have a double matrix and I want its elements to pass them to a complex matrix. I want to use casting. For example for every even elements of double matrix I fill the real part of the complex matrix and for every odd elements ,the imaginary.

I am trying the below code but I have no result for complex matrix (all elements are zero).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct{

    double re,im;
}
myComplex;

int main(int argc, const char* argv[]) {

    int N=2;
    double * theDouble=(double*)malloc(2*N*N*sizeof(double));

    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<N;j++){
            theDouble[i*N+j]=i+j;
        }
    }

    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<N;j++){
            printf("\nmydouble=%f\t",theDouble[i*N+j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

    myComplex * theComplex;
    theComplex= (myComplex *)malloc(N*N*sizeof(myComplex));

    //theDouble= (double *)theComplex;

    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<N;j++){
            theComplex[i*N+j].re=theDouble[(i*N+j)*2];

        }
    }

    //fill imaginary part
    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<N;j++){
            theComplex[i*N+j].im=theDouble[(i*N+j)*2+1];

        }
    }

    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){
        for (int j=0;j<N;j++){
            printf("\nComplex_real=%f\t",theComplexPtr[i*N+j].re);
        printf("\nComplex_imag=%f\t",theComplexPtr[i*N+j].im);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }


    return 0;     
}

Also,is there a faster (better) way to do this ? (with casting).

share|improve this question
2  
Faster perhaps not, but why don't you use the standard complex types that modern C provides? They have the advantage of implementing all arithmetic directly and also having math functions that work with complex. Don't reinvent the wheel. – Jens Gustedt Feb 23 '14 at 22:21
    
The code you've included doesn't compile (you define theDoubl and use theDouble; you define theComplex but use theComple once). What is your real code? – Jonathan Leffler Feb 23 '14 at 22:24
2  
perhaps, theDouble= (double *)theComplex; not need. – BLUEPIXY Feb 23 '14 at 22:27
1  
What's the purpose of this line: theDouble= (double *)theComplex;? – ThoAppelsin Feb 23 '14 at 22:28
1  
I'm not sure what you're thinking of with the last assignment in myComplex * theComplex; theComplex= (myComplex *)malloc(N*N*sizeof(myComplex)); theDouble= (double *)theComplex; but you've leaked the original theDouble allocation and you're now trying to treat that data differently — very peculiar. Remove that line and you get sane behaviour. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 23 '14 at 22:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to create the data for a myComplex matrix of size N x N, the number of doubles has to be 2 x N x N.

If I understand you correctly, the data for the i-th row and j-th column of the complex matrix are at positions (i*N+j)*2 and (i*N+j)*2+1 in the double array.

Also, as others have already pointed out, remove the line theDouble= (double *)theComplex;.

share|improve this answer
    
@R Sahu:Ok , that did it.But I can't uderstand why it has to be 2*N*N.Because the elements of double are 4.The elements of complex are still 4.Also,while I am filling theComplex, it fills one time the correct results and one time zero results. – George Feb 24 '14 at 8:58
    
@George, there are two doubles in each myComplex. The size of each myComplex is 2 times the size of double, i.e. sizeof(myComplex) == 2*sizeof(double). – R Sahu Feb 24 '14 at 16:16
    
@R Sahu:Ok,itdepends how you want to use it I think.And I think the opposite is true.Size of double =2 size of complex. – George Feb 24 '14 at 18:44

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