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I have this list. keys = ['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta'] I want to iterate through the list to remove the current element from the list. For the above list, I want to have something like ths

Messi is out
['Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
Neymar is out
['Messi', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
Xavi is out
['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Iniesta']
Iniesta is out
['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi']

This is the code I have so far. It doesn't seem to work

keys = ['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
tmp_keys = keys
length = len(keys)
for player in keys:
   if player in tmp_keys:
       print player + " is out"
       print tmp_keys
       tmp_keys.remove(player)
       tmp_keys = keys

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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It's not clear what you are trying to do, but every time you remove a player from tmp_keys, the next line re-assigns tmp_keys so it will always have the same elements as keys. –  Hotpepper Feb 24 at 0:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code seems to be printing tmp_keys before removing the item. I think it will work if you switch these statements around.

A better way to copy the list might simply be:

tmp_keys = list(keys)

as saying tmp_keys = keys is just making tmp_keys another tag for the same list as keys

example:

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> b = a  

>>> print a    
[1,2,3]

>>> print b 
[1,2,3]

>>> b.append(4)

>>> print a 
[1,2,3,4]

>>> print b  
[1,2,3,4]

You could also do this:

from itertools import combinations

keys = ['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']

c = combinations(keys, 3)

>>> for i in c:
...     print i
('Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi')
('Messi', 'Neymar', 'Iniesta')
('Messi', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta')
('Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta')

for comb in c:
    for name in keys:
    if name not in comb:
        print "{0} is out".format(name)
        print list(comb) # without list() you will just get tuples

output:

Iniesta is out
['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi']
Xavi is out
['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Iniesta']
Neymar is out
['Messi', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
Messi is out
['Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
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it works like a charm. Thanks! –  user3078335 Feb 24 at 1:13

You apparently print the list before you remove it. You want to print it after you remove it. Also you should copy the list, not use =

keys = ['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
tmp_keys = keys[:]
length = len(keys)
for player in keys:
  if player in tmp_keys:
    print player + " is out"
    tmp_keys.remove(player)
    print tmp_keys
    tmp_keys = keys[:]

http://docs.python.org/2/library/copy.html

Assignment statements in Python do not copy objects, they create bindings between a target and an object. For collections that are mutable or contain mutable items, a copy is sometimes needed so one can change one copy without changing the other.

Since list does not have copy(), a different method is required to prevent the change to tmp_keys from also affecting keys

as an example

keys = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
tmp_keys = keys

del tmp_keys(3)
print keys

OUTPUT: a b c e

tmp_keys = keys[:]
print tmp_keys
print keys

OUTPUT:

a b c e
a b c d e
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@Totem Thanks I fixed the reference –  sabbahillel Feb 24 at 19:45

Use the filter command:

filter( lambda x: x!='Messi', ['Messi', 'Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta'])
['Neymar', 'Xavi', 'Iniesta']
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