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I have a homework assignment to figure out what this will print out:

static const int *f(const int a[], int i) { return &a[i + 2]; }

int a[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
f(a, 1)[1]; //What this will return

I ran the program and got 5, but do not understand, in the least, how this works.

The function f looks like a pointer to me, but I don't understand what the subscript 1 is doing.

Could someone explain this to me, in depth?

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Wouldn't explaining this defeat the purpose of your assignment? I will be down-voting any full answers to this question. –  Jonathon Reinhart Feb 24 at 2:39
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well the only cheater would be the OP, the answerers are trying to be helpful. –  Grady Player Feb 24 at 2:44
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@JonathonReinhart The homework assignment only asked to find the output; I'm just interested in learning how this function works (for future tests). I tried searching but still have trouble grasping the concept behind this which is why I asked this quesiton –  WCGPR0 Feb 24 at 2:47
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@WCGPR0 Obviously it's intended that you understand what's going on in order to provide the right answer. You're definitely defeating the purpose of the assignment. If I were your professor, and saw that you asked this verbatim question from my assignment, you'd receive a zero. –  Jonathon Reinhart Feb 24 at 2:50
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@JonathonReinhart It is a good thing you are not. Since you have no idea what the exact rules and wording of the homework are.( unless you are THE professor which is unlikely ) –  this Feb 24 at 2:54
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is entirely about pointer arithmetic / array indexing (which are related to each other). The function is there to throw you off.

The function returns the address of the array's element at index i + 2. You pass 1 for i, so you're getting back the address of the fourth element (recall that array indexes are zero-based).

What happens next is that you use the result as a new origin of an array, and pick the second element from it. That second element happens to be 5.

Index : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
        - - - - - - -
Value : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
              ^
              |
       Return value of f(a, 1) is the new origin
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I was one of the "downvoting idiots". Like I said in the comment above. Providing a complete homework solution is encouraging cheating, in my opinion. –  Jonathon Reinhart Feb 24 at 2:51
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@JonathonReinhart I agree with you when one writes code for someone's HW assignment. However, when HW is to understand an intentionally convoluted piece of code, providing an explanation to what's going on does not encourage cheating, unless the answer is really an answer written for the professor, not as an explanation for the student. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 24 at 2:59
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first we have the regular array

a[]            = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7
original index = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6

when the call to f(a,1) happens, the pointed element is

f(a,1)                           ↓       
    a[3]           = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7
    original index = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6

then the address is return with &. &a[3] is the address of a[3], so the it return the address of the number, as and is treated like an array, that starts in that exact address.

f(a,1)    = 1  , 2  , 3  , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7
new index = -3 , -2 , -1 , 0 , 1 , 2 , 3

when f(a,1)[1] is asked, the index 0 is where the index 3 used to be.

                               ↓       
f(a,1)[1] = 1  , 2  , 3  , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7
new index = -3 , -2 , -1 , 0 , 1 , 2 , 3

and returns 5.

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It's a bit convoluted, but the function f() returns the address of the fourth element. The subscript after the function call then moves up one to the fifth element, which is the number 5.

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