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This question already has an answer here:

What's the use of C# keyword fixed/unsafe?

For example, http://www.dotnetperls.com/fixed

using System;

class Program
{
    unsafe static void Main()
    {
    fixed (char* value = "sam")
    {
        char* ptr = value;
        while (*ptr != '\0')
        {
        Console.WriteLine(*ptr);
        ++ptr;
        }
    }
    }
}

Why do I need to fix it in the first place? Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Alexei Levenkov, Mitch, csl, Soner Gönül, Pranav C Balan Feb 24 '14 at 8:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
2  
You need to fix it so that the pointer you're using will stay valid. But the uses of unsafe code are relatively few and far between, to be honest. I've been writing C# for many years and still don't even remember the various rules for unsafe coding. – Jon Skeet Feb 24 '14 at 7:14
    
check this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f58wzh21.aspx – w.b Feb 24 '14 at 7:14
    
@TimurAykutYıldırım I do not think that is a duplicate - that question asks when this asks why as well. – markmnl Feb 24 '14 at 7:31

C# is a managed language that means the memory is managed automatically, i.e. not by you. If you did not use fixed by the time you come to modify the memory pointed to by your pointer C# could have moved the variable to another memory location so you could be modifying something else!

fixed is logically fixing the variable in memory so it does not move around.

Why does C# move variables in memory around? To compact the memory otherwise programs would use up more memory available to them if objects that are no longer alive left holes other objects cannot fit in (heap memory fragmentation).

I used fixed extensively in a .NET library designed for resource constrained devices to avoid creating garbage copying into buffers and find this feature sorely lacking in other managed languages where you cannot do the same. When writing games in a managed language garbage collection is often one of the biggest bottlenecks so having the ability not to create it is very helpful!

See my question here: C# Copy variables into buffer without creating garbage? for one reason why.

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"I used fixed extensively in a .NET library designed for resource constrained devices to avoid creating garbage copying into buffers and find this feature sorely lacking in other managed languages where you cannot do the same. When writing games in a managed language garbage collection is often one of the biggest bottlenecks so having the ability not to create it is very helpful!" --> Thank you, but sorry can you elaborate. I seems to get the idea, really pinning memory location is for Performance. But I don't really... see how, would appreciate if you elaborate on this! – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 7:57
1  
Pinning memory doesn't give the performance the ability to use pointers to modify memory, in my case copy several variables into a buffer without creating garbage can give performance where garbage collection time is an issue, see my linked question. – markmnl Feb 24 '14 at 8:03
    
Thanks Mark. Read it. How much performance gain you had I wonder by not using intermediate byte[] and copy via pined memory location instead? Was it significant? – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 8:22
    
If you are on Phone or device like Ouya (running mono) and copying a lot it was noticeable - the app freezes when the GC has to run - now it doesn't because there is no garbage. – markmnl Feb 24 '14 at 8:28
    
Great appreciate your input. – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 8:43

unsafe is necessary to deal in pointers.

fixed has two uses:

  • it allows you to pin an array and obtain a pointer to the data
  • when used in an unsafe struct field, it declares a "fixed buffer" - a reserved block of space in a type that is accessed via pointers rather than regular fields

To answer with a specific example - here's some code that is used to perform semantic equality between two byte[] of arbitrary size...

    internal static unsafe  int GetHashCode(byte[] value)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            if (value == null) return -1;
            int len = value.Length;
            if (len == 0) return 0;
            int octects = len / 8, spare = len % 8;
            int acc = 728271210;
            fixed (byte* ptr8 = value)
            {
                long* ptr64 = (long*)ptr8;
                for (int i = 0; i < octects; i++)
                {
                    long val = ptr64[i];
                    int valHash = (((int)val) ^ ((int)(val >> 32)));
                    acc = (((acc << 5) + acc) ^ valHash);
                }
                int offset = len - spare;
                while(spare-- != 0)
                {
                    acc = (((acc << 5) + acc) ^ ptr8[offset++]);
                }
            }
            return acc;
        }            
    }

So if, for example, the buffer was 1000 items, by treating it as a set of long we now only do 125 iterations rather than having to look individually at all 1000 - plus we completely bypass any array bounds checking (which the JIT may or may not remove, depending on how obvious it looks that you can't possibly be violating them).

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Thanks Marc - "for example, the buffer was 1000 items, by treating it as a set of long we now only do 125 iterations rather than having to look individually at all 1000" --- not sure if I follow you but I am guessing you're saying it's basically "Performance Consideration". If you have a big object graph - sometimes, it's faster if you pin/fix its memory location while iterating over it? If so it's the only "Practical" usage I hear thus far (Everyone else just reiterate "yes fix it in memory") – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 7:54
1  
@Swab.Jat if you look at the code, you can see that it is processing each item as a long rather than as a byte - so it is hashing 8 bytes each iteration. Yes, unsafe is usually used as a performance consideration. There is also the scenario where you obtain a pointer to completely unmanaged memory - interop scenarios, basically - but those are much rarer than performance uses. – Marc Gravell Feb 24 '14 at 10:06
    
hi Marc, thanks. Mark gave me a very useful example - stackoverflow.com/questions/15307431/… – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 10:38

Unsafe code blocks are quite rare to be used. They are predominantly used if you want to create and make use of pointers. Also, any code in unsafe block is out of control of CLR. It is considered to be unverifiable (from MSDN) as far as CLR in concerned.

Now, when garbage collection happens, some object may well be relocated. When prefixed with fixed, we are telling the framework to not to relocate objects whose address pointers are pointing to.

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Note that "Fixed" ia an interop issue. WHen you ge a pointer and hand it over to unmanaged code (for example to a native dll to dump some data there) you CAN NOT have the garbage collector move that object while your call is in progress. Hence fixing it on a location. – TomTom Feb 24 '14 at 7:27
    
That's what MSDN says - fix memory location yes I get it. But why? Any practical usage why we need this language feature at all? Thanks – Swab.Jat Feb 24 '14 at 7:55
    
Mostly while doing interop and marshalling. When you want to retain pointers for longer durations. – danish Feb 24 '14 at 8:47

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