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I have 2 nested divs inside outer one, which has width:100%. Both nested divs should be in one line and first should get it size from it's contents:

<div id="#outer" style="width:100%; border:1px">
  <div id="#inner1" style="border:1px; display:inline">
    inner div 1. Some text...
  </div>
  <div id="#inner2" style="width:100%????; border:1px; display:inline">
    inner div 2...
  </div>
</div>

Question is how to make #inner2 div to get rest of the horizontal space if width of the #inner1 div is not specified and depends on what it is inside?

P.S. All styles are in separate classes in my case, here I putted CSS into style attributes just for simplification.

I want result to work in IE7+ and FF 3.6

In more details for me it looks like this:

 <style type="text/css">
.captionText
{
 float:left;
} 

.captionLine
{
 height: 1px;
 background-color:black;
 margin: 0px;
 margin-left: 5px;
 margin-top: 5px;
 border: 0px;
 padding: 0px;
 padding-top: 1px;
}
 </style>
<table style="width:300px;">
<caption width="100%">
     <div class="captionText">Some text</div>
     <div class="captionLine"> </div>
</caption>
     <tr>
           <td>something</td>
     </tr>
</table>

Here is the image of what I want: Image of what I want

share|improve this question
    
I know I can do it with tables, but I want to do it with divs –  Artem Feb 4 '10 at 17:36
1  
It probably wouldn’t be that obvious with tables either though. I’ve never quite understood the rules browsers use to calculate non-defined table column widths. –  Paul D. Waite Feb 12 '10 at 12:51

10 Answers 10

up vote 76 down vote accepted
+100

The mysterious overflow: hidden; is your friend here. It stops elements adjacent to floats from extending behind the float — I think that’s the layout you’re looking for.

Here’s some slightly edited HTML: I don’t think you can have # characters in your ids:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner1">
        inner div 1. Some text...
    </div>
    <div id="inner2">
        inner div 2...
    </div>
</div>

And here’s the CSS to achieve the layout you want.

(I put in additional CSS for IE 6 with HTML conditional comments. I just noticed you didn’t actually need it to work in IE 6 too, but if you fancy being nice to the IE 6 users out there...)

<style type="text/css">
#outer {
    overflow: hidden;/* Makes #outer contain its floated children */
    width: 100%;

    /* Colours and borders for illustration purposes */
    border: solid 3px #666;
    background: #ddd;
}

#inner1 {
    float: left;/* Make this div as wide as its contents */

    /* Colours and borders for illustration purposes */
    border: solid 3px #c00;
    background: #fdd;
}

#inner2 {
    overflow: hidden;/* Make this div take up the rest of the horizontal space, and no more */

    /* Colours and borders for illustration purposes */
    border: solid 3px #00c;
    background: #ddf;
}
</style>

<!--[if lte IE 6]>
<style type="text/css">
#inner2 {
    zoom: 1;/* Make this div take up the rest of the horizontal space, and no more, in IE 6 */
}

#inner1 {
    margin-right: -3px;/* Fix the 3-pixel gap that the previous rule introduces. (Shit like this is why web developers hate IE 6.) */
}
</style>
<![endif]-->

Tested and working in IE 6, 7, and 8; Firefox 3.5; and Chrome 4.

share|improve this answer
1  
Paul Waite gave you the correct answer. Pay up! :) –  Robusto Feb 14 '10 at 2:00
    
Heh, thank you! Tell me about it! –  Paul D. Waite Feb 14 '10 at 5:08
1  
Worked for me, thank you! –  Artem Feb 15 '10 at 18:13
3  
Could you explain how the hell this works? –  Eric Jul 24 '10 at 12:51
2  
@Eric I am the one who upvoted your comment, but then a coworker sent me this which explains it. –  Michael Feb 9 '12 at 22:10

You would need to float the inner1 div to the left, like so:

<div id="#outer" ....>
    <div id='#inner1" style="float:left; border: 1px solid #000;">
        blabla
    </div>
    <div id="#inner2" style="... DON'T USE WIDTH AND DISPLAY HERE! ...">
        gnihihi
    </div>
</div>

This should do the trick. Check it out! bye

share|improve this answer
    
in this case for me second div overlaps 1st one and gets 100% width –  Artem Feb 4 '10 at 16:59

You do not need to use div for nested element, just use SPAN like this

 <div>
     <span style="display:inline-block;width: auto;border: solid 1px black;">
            hey you
     </span>
     <span style="display:inline-block;marging: 0px 2px;border: solid 1px black;">
           always use proper tools.
     </span>
 </div>
share|improve this answer
    
looks like inline-block is not supported for IE7: quirksmode.org/css/display.html –  Artem Feb 4 '10 at 17:00
    
@Artem — No, IE5.5 is the only version of IE on that chart which doesn't support it. –  Quentin Feb 4 '10 at 17:21
    
ok, anyway I tried it, it didn't work for me. let me add more details... –  Artem Feb 4 '10 at 17:22
    
Just for the record, in IE 7 and earlier, display:inline-block; is only supported on elements that are display:inline; by default — for example, it is supported on <span> and <a>, but isn’t supported on <div> or <li>. –  Paul D. Waite May 9 '12 at 7:48

Expanding on @Nasser Hajloo's answer, this works for me (even in IE6)

 <div style="width: 400px; border: solid 1px red;"> 
     <span style="float:left;width: auto;border: solid 1px black;"> 
            hey you 
     </span> 
     <div style="display:inline-block;margin: 0px 2px;border: solid 1px black;">always use proper tools.</div> 
 </div> 

Try it with the main div smaller than 400px to see how it adjusts. (It also works with divs rather than spans - the key is the width: auto in the first div/span.)

share|improve this answer
    
if you set width to 1400 in you example you'll see why it does not work: right part does not get the rest of the space in FF3.6. Sorry. –  Artem Feb 4 '10 at 20:54
    
Only have IE6 at work (stop laughing!). Will have a look when I get home. –  Traingamer Feb 4 '10 at 21:34

Try this: nest inner1 inside inner2, and remove the display:inline from inner2, like this:

<div id="#outer" style="width:100%; border:1px solid red">
  <div id="#inner2" style="width:100%; border:1px solid black;">
     <div id="#inner1" style="border:1px solid blue; display:inline">
      inner div 1. Some text...
     </div>
  inner div 2...
  </div>
</div>

You can see it working here: http://jsbin.com/adiwi

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this works for text, but what if I speficically need div to have the rest of the space, because I need just to draw a border, no text? –  Artem Feb 10 '10 at 23:40
    
Should still work, I imagine. –  graphicdivine Feb 11 '10 at 8:37

From your code it looks like you are trying to get a horizontal line to fill the empty space in your div. If I'm correct your looking to create a visual effect with markup. Correct me if I'm wrong.

(Would be nice to see an image of what you want)

Example:

Title ---------------------------

or

Title: Caption ------------------

This is not best practice. You should try to get this effect with CSS.

Try making your code more semantic first:

<div id="#outer" style="width:100%; border:1px">
  <h3 style="border:1px; display:inline">
    Caption
  </h3>
</div>

To get the line:

  1. create an image with the color you want
  2. make its height the same that you want the line to be in px
  3. position it with the background property

.

#outer h3 {
display: inline;
background-color: #000;
color: #FFF;
}

#outer {
width: 100%; /* is the default of block element but just for celerity */
background: #000 url('image path') center left; /* position the image */
}
share|improve this answer

Another solution is to run a javascript which resizes the captionLine class when document has loaded like this.
Took some time to get it working under IE8, have not tried IE7 but should work.
2 things to note.

  1. IE does not support getElementsByClassName, therefor this function is rewritten.
  2. IE handles margins differently when objects are resized and moved with style.marginLeft, somehow IE seems to keep the margin in the class declaration and adds this to the new style.margin.
<body onload="resizeCaptionLine()">
<style>
caption {
 border: 1px solid blue;
 padding: 0px;
}
.captionText {
 border: 1px solid red;
 float: left;
}
.captionLine {
 background-color:black;
 margin: 0px;
 margin: 5px 0px 0px 5px;
 border: 0px;
 padding: 0px;
 padding-top: 1px;
}
</style>

<table style="width:300px;">
<caption width="100%" name="caption1">
     <div class="captionText">Some text</div>
     <div class="captionLine"> </div>
</caption>
     <tr>
           <td>something</td>
     </tr>
</table>
<table style="width:300px;">
<caption width="100%" name="caption2">
     <div class="captionText">Some text</div>
     <div class="captionLine"> </div>
</caption>
     <tr>
           <td>something</td>
     </tr>
</table>

<script type="text/javascript">

function getElementsByClassName(node, class_name) {
  elems = node.all || node.getElementsByTagName('*');
  var arr = new Array();
  for(j = 0; j < elems.length; j++)
  {
    if (elems[j].className == class_name)
       arr[arr.length] = elems[j];
  }
  return arr;
}

function resizeCaptionLine()
{
 var elems = getElementsByClassName(document, 'captionLine');
 for(i = 0; i < elems.length ; i++)
 {
   var parent = elems[i].parentNode;
   var sibling = getElementsByClassName(parent, 'captionText');
   var width = parent.offsetWidth - sibling[0].offsetWidth;

    if(elems[i].currentStyle)
   {
     var currentMargin = elems[i].currentStyle.marginLeft;
     var margin = parseInt(currentMargin.substr(0,currentMargin.length-2));
     elems[i].style.marginLeft = (sibling[0].offsetWidth) + "px";
   }
   else if (document.defaultView && document.defaultView.getComputedStyle)
   {
     var currentStyle = document.defaultView.getComputedStyle(elems[i], '');
     var currentMargin = currentStyle.marginLeft;
     var margin = parseInt(currentMargin.substr(0,currentMargin.length-2));
     elems[i].style.marginLeft = (sibling[0].offsetWidth + margin) + "px";
   }
   else
   {
     var currentMargin = elems[i].style.marginLeft;
     var margin = parseInt(currentMargin.substr(0,currentMargin.length-2));
     elems[i].style.marginLeft = (sibling[0].offsetWidth) + "px";
   }
   elems[i].style.width = (width - margin)+"px";
 } 
}
</script>
</body>
share|improve this answer

Answer is really simple! If you have fixed div (menu) on the left side, then give fixed div float: left and your right flexible div margin-left that is bigger then width of first fixed div.

share|improve this answer

If yu're reading this now you can probably use calc, so be thankful.

HTML

<div class="universe">
  <div class="somewidth">
  </div>
  <div class="everythingelse">
  </div>
</div>

CSS

.universe {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
}

.somewidth {
  width: 200px;
  height: 100%;
}

.everythingelse {
  width: 800px; /* fallback for emergencies */
  width: calc(100% - 200px);
  width: -moz-calc(100% - 200px);
  width: -webkit-calc(100% - 200px);
  height: 100%;
}

See the working example on JSFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really-really cool. Not in IE7 though at the time of writing :) –  Artem Nov 7 '13 at 6:55

Your first problem is that you are prefixing your ids with a '#'. The # is only used in CSS to refer to the element with that id, e.g. the CSS rule #outer{width:100%} refers to your element:

<div id="outer"></div>

Also you don't need to use width's on div's (or any other block elements) that aren't floated, as they already automatically take up 100% of the available width.

If you want to the 2 DIVs to appear on the same line you have to float the first one to the left. The adjacent DIV will then appear on the side, again you don't need to sepecify widthd for the second element. Here is your complete example including a different coloured border for each div.

I've made the borders bigger so you can see clearer whats going on.

<html><body>
<style type="text/css">
#outer {
    border: solid 5px #c00;
}
#inner1 {
    border: solid 5px #0c0;
    float: left;
    width: 200px;
    height: 300px;
}
#inner2 {
    border: solid 5px #00c;
    height: 300px;
    margin-left: 210px; /* 200px left width + 2 x 5px borders */
}
</style>

<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner1">
    inner div 1. Some text...
  </div>
  <div id="inner2">
    inner div 2...
  </div>
</div>

</body></html>
share|improve this answer
    
Fail. Inner1 should get it's size from it's contents. –  Dustman Feb 15 '10 at 6:31
    
Than just don't specify the width –  mythz Feb 15 '10 at 8:08

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