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I'm going through a tutorial on core-data in Objective-C and can't understand the following syntax:

@interface RootViewController : UITableViewController <CLLocationManagerDelegate> {
          NSMutableArray *eventsArray;
          NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext;
          CLLocationManager *locationManager;
          UIBarButtonItem *addButton;
      }
      @property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray *eventsArray;
      @property (nonatomic, retain) NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext;
      @property (nonatomic, retain) CLLocationManager *locationManager;
      @property (nonatomic, retain) UIBarButtonItem *addButton;
      @end

We have four properties here that are declared in the implementation file, which to my understanding means they are private. What exactly is happening within the curly brackets? Why are these variables put there? And also, is it a class extension? I see () are missing here so probably it is not. What is this kind of syntax called then?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its not a category.Its just a class named RootViewController which extends UITableViewController and implements protocol CLLocationManagerDelegate.

Coming to your braces ->
generally if you don't create iVars in curly braces, by default they are created with underscore as prefix to them. This is done by compiler.

But here, you explicitly said, that the ivar should be without underscore(_).

Any you should synthesize them as below or else it will give a warning.

@synthesize eventsArray= eventsArray;
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Ok cool I understand. And what is using these curly braces called? Is it a class category/extension? –  ZviBar Feb 24 at 12:53
    
It's a class called RootViewController which heritate UITableViewController and implement CCLocationManagerDelegate protocol –  KIDdAe Feb 24 at 12:55
    
Aren't getters and setters created automatically for every property? If so, why should I syntesize those variables again? Synthesizing is creating getters and setters for variables, isn't it? And those getters and setters should be created for every property. –  ZviBar Feb 24 at 13:25
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It's just a regular definition of a RootViewController class, the @interface doesn't necessarily have to be in a header file, private classes (that shouldn't/don't need to be accessible elsewhere) can also be defined directly in the .m file.

The definitions in the curly braces are just regular instance variables of the RootViewController class.

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But why would you declare iVars again as they are declared with Property? I mean when you declare variables with property, isn't that private to the class as well as public to other classes when synthesized? –  GenieWanted Feb 24 at 12:59
1  
It's probably just old code that was written before automatic synthesis for ivars was available. –  omz Feb 24 at 13:22
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What you have is called the class interface. It is just the .h file of your program files. .If you want a class category, just do

@interface RootViewController (CategoryName) 

and for an extension, inside the .m type

@interface RootViewController () 
@end 
@implementation
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Variables between curly braces:

{
    NSMutableArray *eventsArray;
    NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext;
    CLLocationManager *locationManager;
    UIBarButtonItem *addButton;
}

are just usual variables.

For variable, defined with @property base word:

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray *eventsArray;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSManagedObjectContext *managedObjectContext;
@property (nonatomic, retain) CLLocationManager *locationManager;
@property (nonatomic, retain) UIBarButtonItem *addButton;

created accessor and mutator methods. And also you can define options for those variables in bracers. Plus you can get local synonym for them, using base word @synthesize in .m file, like

@synthesize addButton = myLovelyButton;

then you can use myLovelyButton in .m file instead addButton

Both of these definition do not belong to the category. For define category just type code like:

@interface <#className#> (<#categoryName#>)
{
    //optional variables here
    int i;
    NSString *s;
}
//optional variables here
@property NSString *str;

//optional methods here
-(void)doSomething;
@end

Then you can implement your methods and use these variables:

@implementation <#className#> (<#categoryName#>)
-(void)doSomething
{
    int i = 0;
    str = @"blah";
    s = @"wow";
    NSLog(@"%i - %@ - %@",i,str,s);
}
@end

Use that for add your methods to existing classes.

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Variables inside brackets directly after the @interface or @implementation are instance variables. These are variables associated with each instance of your class, and thus accessible anywhere in your instance methods.

If you don't put the brackets, you declare global variables. Any variable declared outside of any bracket block will be a global variable, wether these variables are before or after the @implementation directive. And global variables are evil and needs to be avoided at all costs (you can declare global constants, but avoid global variables), especially because they are not thread-safe (and may thus generate bugs that are a mess to debug).

@interface YourClass : ParentClass

{

// Declare instance variables here

int ivar1;

}

// declare instance and class methods here, as well as properties (which are nothing more than getter/setter instance methods)

-(void)printIVar;

@end

// .m

int someGlobalVariable; // Global variable (bad idea!!)

@implementation YourClass

int someOtherGlobalVariable; // Still a bad idea

-(void)printIVar

{

NSLog(@"ivar = %d", ivar1); // you can access ivar1 because it is an instance variable

// Each instance of YourClass (created using [[YourClass alloc] init] will have its own value for ivar1

}

Only modern compilers let you declare instance variables (still in brackets) also inside either your class extension (@interface YourClass () in your .m implementation file) or in your @implementation, in addition to the possibility to declare them after the @interface in your .h. The benefits being to hide those instance variables from external users of your classes, by declaring them in the .m file and not in the .h file anymore, because users of your class don't need to be aware of the internal coding details of your class, but only needs to know the public API.

One final advice: instead of using instance variables, Apple more and more recommends to use @property directly, and let the compiler (explicitely using the @synthesize directive, or implicity with modern LLVM compilers) generate the internal backing variable. So that at the end you generally won't need to declare instance variables at all, and thus omit the empty { } after the @interface directive:

// .h

@interface YourClass : ParentClass

// Declare methods and properties here

@property(nonatomic, assign) int prop1;

-(void)printProp;

@end


// .m

@implementation YourClass

// @synthesize prop1; // That's even not needed with modern LLVM compiler

-(void)printProp

{

   NSLog(@"ivar = %d", self.prop1);

}
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