Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a property that I want to let inheritors write to, but keep readonly externally, what is the preferred way to implement this? I usually go with something like this:

private object m_myProp;
public object MyProp
{
    get { return m_myProp; }
}
protected void SetMyProp(object value)
{
    m_myProp = value;
}

Is there a better way?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted
private object m_myProp;
public object MyProp
{
    get { return m_myProp; }
    protected set { m_myProp = value; }
}

Or in C# 3.0

public object MyProp {get; protected set;}
share|improve this answer
    
The protected field will prove to be superior if there's ever a need to use any Interlocked methods on it. I find it odd that C# exposes event delegates with the same name as the events, but doesn't expose auto-property backing variables at all. –  supercat Oct 10 '12 at 18:27

Having a setter and getter isn't really any better than having a variable at that level of visibility.

Therefore you could just make the variable itself protected and the reader public.

That said, setters and getters are an indicator of bad OO--are you sure you need them? You should be asking the object to do something with its members, not asking it for its members then manipulating them outside the object.

This is a very general rule and there are a lot of exceptions.

share|improve this answer
2  
Nonsense; a getter/setter is significantly better than a protected field. Getters/setters are not an indicator of bad OO: they exhibit encapsulation and allow polymorphism (via virtual) - how OO do you want? –  Marc Gravell Oct 20 '08 at 21:13
    
They still expose the implementation of your class, and are an indication that you are getting data out instead of asking an class to do an operation for you. That's not OO, it's fake-oo that procedural programmers use before they actually get OO. –  Bill K Oct 20 '08 at 23:10
    
Here's a good article about it if you are interested: javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-09-2003/jw-0905-toolbox.html –  Bill K Oct 20 '08 at 23:11
    
I'm not quite prepared to say that article's wrong in every particular, but it's wrong in every particular that I examined. –  Robert Rossney Oct 21 '08 at 0:35
    
@Bill K: no; the accessors (get/set) are methods; the caller calls the methods to ask the class to do something... I'd agree with Robert: that article is a bit, erm, wrong. If you want an immutable class, then fine - but you need to be able to examine state. –  Marc Gravell Oct 21 '08 at 7:03

This is definitely the way to go.

public object MyProp {get; protected set;}

If you're on an older version of C# then this is the way to go.

private object _myProp;
public object MyProp
{
    get { return _myProp; }
    protected set { _myProp = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
And if you're on a very old version of C#, you have to have a separate protected Set method :( –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '08 at 21:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.