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Lately I've run into the following construction in the code:

typedef sometype sometype;

Pay attention please that "sometype" stands for absolutely the same type without any additions like "struct" etc.

I wonder what it can be useful for?

UPD: This works only for user defined types.

UPD2: The actual code was in a template context like this:

template <class T>
struct E
{
   typedef T T;
   ...
}
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6  
Are you sure it didn't say: typedef struct sometype sometype;? –  Alex Budovski Feb 4 '10 at 11:34
2  
so a concrete example would be typedef char char ? –  SiegeX Feb 4 '10 at 11:39
    
I wondered about the sample code, did not believe that it can be compiled. Tested. It can: struct A { int x; }; int main(){ typedef A A; A a; return 0; } –  Notinlist Feb 4 '10 at 11:41
    
I can see NO functional benefit to that code. Perhaps it's a typo in the original code. –  acron Feb 4 '10 at 11:42
1  
@Konrad: I don't have that source at hand right now, but it was equivalent to the following: template<class T> class E { typedef T T; }; –  Alex Jenter Feb 4 '10 at 11:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How about to make Template parameters visible to outside entities?

template <class Foo>
struct Bar
{
    typedef Foo Foo;
};

int main()
{
    Bar<int>::Foo foo = 4;
}

Note: Please don't vote this up any more. It was a guess, and I've since tried it. It doesn't work.

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4  
Then why not delete it? –  anon Feb 4 '10 at 13:06
    
Pretty sure it works in some compilers, so if the OP has seen this code around, this might be why, so it's still a valid answer to his question. –  jalf Feb 4 '10 at 14:25
3  
@Niel: Because if I delete it, some other smart fellow will think of the same thing and post it again. Sometimes it's worth knowing what the wrong answer is. –  Kaz Dragon Feb 4 '10 at 15:48
2  
It works in MSVC, but it's illegal C++. See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/486508/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 4 '10 at 15:51
    
Then we can all downvote the next smart guy? :) –  UncleBens Feb 4 '10 at 17:13

Given your additional information about templates, we can now answer.

The use-case is when you want to specialize on the type of a template. One typical example is the following:

template <typename T>
struct nonconst {
    typedef T t;
};

template <typename T>
struct nonconst<T const> {
    typedef T t;
};

This effectively allows you to remove the const qualifier from any type:

nonconst<int>::t x;
nonconst<int const>::t y;
assert(typeid(x) == typeid(int));
assert(typeid(y) == typeid(int));

There are many similar use-cases, e.g. to add (or remove) the pointer qualifier from a type, provide defaults and specializations for certain types, etc.

However, notice the different casing of the type names! Equal types in typedef T T are illegal C++.[I stand corrected: §7.1.3.2] Furthermore, the de-fact naming standard (cemented by its use in Boost libraries) is to call the type name alias type, e.g.:

typedef T type;
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"Equal types in typedef T T are illegal " - this is incorrect. See 7.1.3.2 in the C++'03 Standard. –  Alex Jenter Feb 4 '10 at 12:23
    
@Alex: I wasn’t aware of that. However, g++ 4.4.2 (-pedantic) bails out when I use identical casing in the above code. So is this a compiler bug? –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 4 '10 at 12:28
3  
1  
Additionally, a member declaration is forbidden to introduce a name into a class scope that changes the result of lookup for a use of that name during completion of the class' scope. Having placed typedef foo foo; as a member declaration, however, does exactly that (it makes use of foo, but also declares a new name foo). See 3.3.6/1 bullet 2. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 4 '10 at 16:03
1  
@Johannes: Thanks for the info! So this is just MSVC being non-conformant and someone taking advantage of it... –  Alex Jenter Feb 4 '10 at 20:47

In C++, you can put a typedef in a namespace or class, and then refer to it relative to that namespace or class, which can be useful if the real type might change in the future.

e.g.

class IntHolder
{
    public:
        typedef int int;
        IntHolder::int i;
};
...
IntHolder foo;
IntHolder::int i = foo.i;

(NB: I haven't checked that's quite the right syntax - but hopefully you get the idea)

If at some future point you actually want to hold long in IntHolder you only need to change the IntHolder code.

Now, normally you name the type differently, but maybe you can do as above?

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Honorary +1 for a decent use scenario. I can see this easily happening for types less built-in than int. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 11:46
    
It doesn't seem to compile any more than all the other answers suggesting this (with GCC and Comeau). - If the class is supposed to have only one typedef, just use typedef X type;, so people wouldn't have to guess each time. I mean, IntHolder::int would turn out to be long? Why call it int then and not IntHolder::type? –  UncleBens Feb 4 '10 at 17:18
    
I didn't try it - and I'm glad I didn't because I would have hit gcc refusing it - whereas the OP's compiler (VS) managed to compile the template version. –  Douglas Leeder Feb 5 '10 at 8:35
    
As for the naming - it was a micro, non-compiled example. I hoped to get the idea across - and obviously the typedef had to be in that form to match the OP's question! –  Douglas Leeder Feb 5 '10 at 8:36

I have a theory. It could be a result of some refactorings. For example a templated type become not templated.

typedef SomeCleverTemplate<Rocket> SuperThing;

Then they deleted the template, beacuse there were no other usage of it in the code, and for just to be safe they replaced every SomeCleverTemplate<Rocket> to SuperThing.

typedef SuperThing SuperThing;

Does it make sense in the real context?

share|improve this answer
    
Honorary +1 for "real context of too much automation". Sorry it's not a real +1, I'm out for the next 12 hours. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 11:52
    
And why woudn't it work without a typedef? –  Alex Jenter Feb 4 '10 at 11:58
    
It would. I think you can delete that line from the code. –  Notinlist Feb 4 '10 at 12:17

As it as already been mentioned, it works especially well within a template:

template <class Foo>
struct Bar
{
  typedef Foo Foo;
};

But it can also be combined with template specialization:

template <class Foo>
struct Bar<Foo*>
{
  typedef Foo Foo;
};

Now, I can do:

Bar<int>::Foo i = 0;
Bar<int*>::Foo j = i;

Bar thus effectively behaves as a kind of type wrapper, which may be important for its interface (if there is a bool equals(Foo i) const for example).

Usually the name elected has some meaning value_type for example...

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New idea! Certain clubs of programming like extensive usage of typedefs...

zoo/animals/types.h:

namespace zoo
{
    namespace animals
    {
        typedef size_t Count;
        // ...
    } // namespace animals
} // namespace zoo

zoo/animals/zebra.h:

#include "zoo/animals/types.h"

namespace zoo
{
    namespace animals
    {
        class Zebra {
        public:
            typedef Count Count;
            Count getLegCount() const;
            // ...
        }; // class Zebra
    } // namespace animals
} // namespace zoo

main.cpp:

#include "zoo/animals/zebra.h"

int main()
{
    typedef zoo::animals::Zebra Zebra;
    Zebra z;
    Zebra::Count n = z.getLegCount();
    // Not as zoo::animals::Count
    // No using namespace zoo::animals required,
    // we are using just one item from there, the Zebra.
    // Definition of Zebra::Count may change, your usage remains robust.
    return 0;
}

I just have a similar situation at my workplace. The translation of it may be a little bit silly, but I wanted to present it in a hurry.

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