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I have got a line in such format:

line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'

I would like to extract these values to a dictionary, getting such result:

{
'A': '15',
'B': '8',
'C': 'false',
'D': '[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'
}

If not the D value, I could have used such simple method:

result = dict(e.split('=') for e in line.split(', '))

But given the fact that D contains ', ' as a separator, I get a total mess instead

{
'A': '15',
'B': '8',
'C': 'false',
'D': '[somevar',
'a': '0.1',
'b': '77',
'c': 'true]'
}

I would appreciate any advice - I have not tried with regexps yet, but this thing has to be fast, as there are dozens of gigabytes of such lines, and I am afraid that regexping would slow it down a lot...

EDIT: Benchmarks

I have wrapped most of the answers below into functions and used ipython's %timeit magic function to measure the execution times.

The test file was created on tmpfs in RAM by doing simply:

 for i in {1..1000000}; do echo 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]' >> test_file; done

This is how the complete test program looked like:

import shlex
import re

def kalgasnik(line):
    lexer = shlex.shlex(line)
    lexer.wordchars += '.'
    values = [['']]
    stack = [values]
    for token in lexer:
        if token == ',':
            stack[-1] += [['']]
        elif token == '=':
            stack[-1][-1] += ['']
        elif token == '[':
            v = [['']]
            stack[-1][-1][-1] = v
            stack += [v]
        elif token == ']':
            sub = stack.pop()
            stack[-1][-1][-1] = {v[0]: v[1] if len(v) > 1 else None for v in sub}
        else:
            stack[-1][-1][-1] += token
    values = {v[0]: v[1] if len(v) > 1 else None for v in values}

    return values

def roberto(myline):
    mydict = {}
    parsecheck = {'(':1, '[':1, '{':1, ')':-1, ']':-1, '}':-1}
    parsecount = 0
    chargroup = ''
    myline = myline + ','
    for thischar in myline:
        parsecount += parsecheck.get(thischar, 0)
        if parsecount == 0:
            if thischar == '=':
                thiskey = chargroup.strip()
                chargroup = ''
            elif thischar == ',':
                mydict[thiskey] = chargroup
                chargroup = ''
            else:
                chargroup += thischar
        else:
            chargroup += thischar

    return mydict       

def xavier(line):
    regexp = r'(\w*)=(\[[^\]]*\]|[^,]*),?\s*'
    outdict = dict((match.group(1),match.group(2)) for match in re.finditer(regexp,line))

    return outdict

def wim(line):
    outdict = dict(x.split('=', 1) for x in shlex.split(line.replace("[", "'[").replace("]", "]'")))

    return outdict

def gorkypl(line):
    outdict = dict(e.split('=') for e in line.split(', '))

    return outdict

def run_test(method):
    with open('test_file', 'r') as infile:
        for line in infile:
            method(line)

And here are the results:

%timeit run_test(kalgasnik)
1 loops, best of 3: 3min 52s per loop

%timeit run_test(roberto)
1 loops, best of 3: 30.2 s per loop

%timeit run_test(xavier)
1 loops, best of 3: 12.1 s per loop

%timeit run_test(wim)
1 loops, best of 3: 2min 41 s per loop

And for the sake of comparison, the (not-working-correctly) original idea based purely on split.

%timeit run_test(gorkypl)
1 loops, best of 3: 8.27 s per loop

So, basically, Xavier's regexp-based solution is not only the most flexible, but the fastest one, and not that much slower than the naive method based on split().

Thank you all a lot!

share|improve this question
    
"I have not tried with regexps yet..." Regular expressions are probably not suitable for this task. regexps can only parse a finite amount of nested brackets, but the input file may have an arbitrary amount. –  Kevin Feb 24 at 18:20
    
Out of curiosity, are we talking about something like CGH microarray data? –  Roberto Feb 25 at 23:10
    
Nope, rather some kind of HFT logs... –  gorkypl Feb 26 at 10:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If and only if there is not nested bracket it's a perfect fit for regexp.

import re

line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'

regexp = r'(\w*)=(\[[^\]]*\]|[^,]*),?\s*'
print(dict((match.group(1),match.group(2)) for match in re.finditer(regexp,line)))

output

{'A': '15', 'C': 'false', 'B': '8', 'D': '[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'}

concerning your fear of being not fast enought, don't assume mesure. As the regexp is optimised C (except for few pathological cases) there is few chance you can do better.

share|improve this answer

Pass over the input string once and check for list segments.

  1. check if current char equals '['
  2. if [ found replace all = and , with different unique characters until a ] is found
  3. result = dict(e.split('=') for e in line.split(', ')) on modified input string

if the lists can be nested keep track of the depth with a counter.

This would turn

line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'

into

line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar! a?0.1! b?77! c?true]'

after generating the result just replace ? and ! with = and , again

EDIT: don't use normal characters but control characters instead to avoid collisions

share|improve this answer
    
But what if the data in the brackets already contains "?" or "!"? Then they'll be incorrectly turned into "=" and "," in the final step. This is a tricky problem if the string is allowed to contain any character. –  Kevin Feb 24 at 18:36
1  
Even control characters? ASCII has a bunch of characters that shouldn't appear in a input stream. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII#ASCII_control_code_chart use two of these –  H4kor Feb 24 at 18:38

As sample of unnecessary complexity:

import shlex
line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=[A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]]]'
lexer = shlex.shlex(line)
lexer.wordchars += '.'
values = [['']]
stack = [values]
for token in lexer:
    if token == ',':
        stack[-1] += [['']]
    elif token == '=':
        stack[-1][-1] += ['']
    elif token == '[':
        v = [['']]
        stack[-1][-1][-1] = v
        stack += [v]
    elif token == ']':
        sub = stack.pop()
        stack[-1][-1][-1] = {v[0]: v[1] if len(v) > 1 else None for v in sub}
    else:
        stack[-1][-1][-1] += token
values = {v[0]: v[1] if len(v) > 1 else None for v in values}

Result:

>>> line
'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=[A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]]]'

>>> values
{'A': '15',
 'B': '8',
 'C': 'false',
 'D': {'a': '0.1',
       'b': '77',
       'c': {'A': '15',
             'B': '8',
             'C': 'false',
             'D': {'a': '0.1', 'b': '77', 'c': 'true', 'somevar': None}},
       'somevar': None}}
share|improve this answer

If you can guarantee that there are no single quotes or nested brackets in the data, then you might be able to get away with something like this:

>>> import shlex
>>> print line
A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]
>>> for s in shlex.split(line.replace("[", "'[").replace("]", "]'")):
...     print s
...     
A=15,
B=8,
C=false,
D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]
>>> dict(x.split('=', 1) for x in shlex.split(line.replace("[", "'[").replace("]", "]'")))
{'A': '15,', 'B': '8,', 'C': 'false,', 'D': '[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'}
share|improve this answer

How about using the '=' to read it as a csv

>>> line = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'
>>> mod_line = line.replace('[','"') #replace [ and ] with " so it can be used as a csv quote char
>>> mod_line = mod_line.replace(']','"')
>>> lines_list = []
>>> lines_list.append(mod_line) #put line into an interable object for csv reader
>>> import csv
>>> reader = csv.reader(lines_list, delimiter='=', quotechar='"')
>>> for row in reader:
...     print(row) # or you could call a function that will turn the returned list into the dictionary you are after
...
['A', '15, B', '8, C', 'false, D', 'somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true']
share|improve this answer

This might not be pretty, but it works - maybe use it as a starting point for something more Python-esque?

myline = 'A=15, B=8, C=false, D=[somevar, a=0.1, b=77, c=true]'

def separate(myline):
    mydict = {}
    parsecheck = {'(':1, '[':1, '{':1, ')':-1, ']':-1, '}':-1}
    parsecount = 0
    chargroup = ''
    myline = myline + ',' # So all the entries end with a ','
    for thischar in myline:
        parsecount += parsecheck.get(thischar, 0)
        if parsecount == 0 and thischar in '=,':
            if thischar == '=':
                thiskey = chargroup.strip()
            elif thischar == ',':
                mydict[thiskey] = chargroup
            chargroup = ''
        else:
            chargroup += thischar
    return mydict

print separate(myline)

[edited to clean the code a bit]

share|improve this answer
    
concerning the speed I think (but not mesured however) it's slower than regex solution –  Xavier Combelle Feb 24 at 19:21
    
Yes, I would agree it must likely be slower. Its advantage is that it will keep track of nested brackets and parentheses. I guess the choice for a regex depends on how standard the input lines are? –  Roberto Feb 24 at 19:30
    
After edits it does not work any more... :) –  gorkypl Feb 25 at 19:09
    
Hello @gorkypl ! It does work for me... Which version of Python are you using? Which error do you get? –  Roberto Feb 25 at 22:22
    
@Roberto, I get an empty dictionary in result, python-2.7.6 –  gorkypl Feb 26 at 10:34

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