Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have read in Learn you a Haskell, that list comprehentions in Haskell could be rewritten as monadic joins or (which is practically the same) do-notation.

However, when I try to rewrite the following code (produce all possible lists having each element from one of given lists):

c :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
c []     = [[]]
c (x:xs) = [a:b | a <- x, b <- c xs]

in such a manner:

d :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
d []     = [[]]
d (x:xs) = do
              a <- x
              b <- d xs
              return a:b

I get the following error:

Couldn't match type `a' with [a]
    `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
        the type signature for d :: [[a]] -> [[a]] 
Expected type: [[a]]
  Actual type: [a] 
In the second argument of `(:)', namely `b' 
In a stmt of a 'do' block: return a : b

if I change the last line of do to this: return a:[b], I don't get errors, but the result is obviously incorrect:

ghci> c [[1, 2], [3, 4]] 
[[1,3],[1,4],[2,3],[2,4]]

ghci> d [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
[[1],[3],[1],[],[1],[4],[1],[],[2],[3],[2],[],[2],[4],[2],[]]

So the questions are:

  1. How can I rewrite this list comprehension?
  2. Are list comprehension and do-notation interchangeable, how replacement can be done generically?
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Look closely at the error message:

Couldn't match type `a' with [a]
    `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
        the type signature for d :: [[a]] -> [[a]] 
Expected type: [[a]]
  Actual type: [a] 

In the second argument of `(:)', namely `b' In a stmt of a 'do' block: return a : b

This means that it was parsed as

(return a) : b

and thus b became the second argument to (:) there; but you intended it as

return (a : b)
share|improve this answer
    
I see now, I was not able to correctly parse error text :-) +1 for thorough explanation. –  sukhmel Feb 24 '14 at 19:30
1  
yeah, Haskell's errors are notoriously unreadable. :) But you'll stop noticing it after you get used to the style. –  Will Ness Feb 24 '14 at 19:31

You need brackets.

return (a:b)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.