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This question already has an answer here:

In a shell script file, suppose there is one line like this.

IP_address=192.168.1.12

From command line, how to change it to?

IP_address=192.168.1.16

I think it may not be done by "sed" because the search string to be replaced is not constant. Maybe "awk"? But I am not expert on that. Thanks a lot for the hint.

To be more specific, the search pattern in the file is "x=y" and should be replaced with "x=z", using only command line tools.

Extra, just to clear some trivials

"y" is not fixed, only "x".

In plain English: I want to search the definition of variable "x" in a script and change the value it is defined to a new value. I don't care (or don't know) what the old value of "x" is, I just want to change it to a new value.

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marked as duplicate by tripleee, kojiro, Alexander Vogt, BMW, The Laughing Man Feb 24 '14 at 21:42

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

2  
If you're not sure of what is it that you want to achieve, how do you expect an answer? – devnull Feb 24 '14 at 18:59
    
just to be obnoxious sed 's/12/16/' <<< "IP_address=192.168.1.12" – Fredrik Pihl Feb 24 '14 at 19:06
    
sed 's/\(IP_address=\).*/\1192.168.1.16/' filename?? – devnull Feb 24 '14 at 19:09
    
@devnull, Great, works! Thank you. – user180574 Feb 24 '14 at 19:14
    
@tripleee, No, it is not duplicate. I use "IP address" only as an illustrative example. My question is more general, and the answers in other question are not applicable in my case. – user180574 Feb 24 '14 at 19:30

With awk, this is as generic as possible:

awk -F= -v OFS="=" -v x="IP Address" -v y="192.168.1.16" '
    $1 == x {$2 = y} 1
' file > tmp && mv tmp file
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Sed will work just fine:

$ sed -e "/^$Y=/s/=.*/=$X/" $script > $script.new

The pattern /<search>/s/<old>/<new>/ means:

  • Find all occurrences of <search> (which will be lines beginning with $Y=).
  • Replace on the line the equal sign and everything after it.
  • Replace it with =$X.

Note that this entire script is in double quotes, so that the shell can interpolate $X and $Y.

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