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I'm trying to create an array of type var with a fixed length. I'm using it in a var Linked List class that I created. I know the size of the array I want to create, don't know what's the correct syntax?

Here's the code:

public dynamic ToArray()
{
    int counter = 0;

    if (this.head == null)
        return null;
    else
        counter = 1;

    ListEntry i = this.head;
    while (i.Next != null)
    {
        counter++;
        i = i.Next;
    }

    var array = new[counter];

    i = this.head;
    for (int j = 0; j < array.Length; j++)
    {
        array[j] = i.Data;
        i = i.Next;
    }

    return array;
}

This part doesn't work:

var array = new[counter];

Any help?

EDIT: Thank you for the input everyone. I must admit that I wasn't very knowledgeable about the terminology of syntactic sugar when I posted. It now makes more sense.

The idea behind this post was to create a dynamic Linked List class that could handle basic value types.

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closed as off-topic by p.s.w.g, rene, gunr2171, Gustav Bertram, lpapp Mar 3 '14 at 3:38

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – p.s.w.g, rene, gunr2171, Gustav Bertram, lpapp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
You haven't said what type of array you want. If you have var array = new string[counter] or something like that, it'll be fine. –  Jon Skeet Feb 24 '14 at 22:11
3  
There is no such thing as a "type var", unless this is a custom type you defined (which would be a crazy bad idea). –  Reed Copsey Feb 24 '14 at 22:11
    
@JonSkeet I think he misunderstands var (due to statement: "create an array of type var")... –  Reed Copsey Feb 24 '14 at 22:12
    
@ReedCopsey: Ah, true - I'd missed that bit. –  Jon Skeet Feb 24 '14 at 22:12
    
Any reason you're not using the LinkedList<T> that's part of the framework? (and that has ToArray() via IEnumberable) –  Linky Feb 24 '14 at 22:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm trying to create an array of type var

var is not a type, it's just a syntactic sugar for implicit type definition.You need to specify your array type:

var array = new YourType[counter];

With using var you let the compiler to infer the type.But in this case it works like a shortcut.Anyway it's useful when you are not sure about the returning type of an expression or method (for example it's useful when using LINQ).

var array = new[counter];

In this line if you mean to create an array that can contains any type of element you can create an array of objects or dynamic:

 var array = new object[counter];

Or:

 var array = new dynamic[counter];
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You probably want this:

var array = new dynamic[counter];

However I am not sure why you want to use dynamic here and return a dynamic from your method. You probably already know the type of ListEntry.Data - you would probably want to return an array of that type.

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If he does want to return a dynamic, say for example, because ListEntry.Data is dynamic, he probably really wants to return a dynamic[]. –  Joel Rondeau Feb 24 '14 at 22:24
    
@JoelRondeau: because ListEntry.Data is dynamic - agreed. As far as compiler is concerned, if the method defines returning dynamic he could return anything including dynamic[]. But what you suggest will make code more readable. –  YK1 Feb 24 '14 at 22:31

You need to specify the array type, or it's like going to a sweet shop and saying "can I have a bag of" and not saying what type you would like, in this case to the compiler. To declare an array, you can do

var array = new type[counter];

However, you cannot create a var array, as var is not a type, but a keyword used in place of a type, like C++11s auto. You will have to define a specific type for your array or you will hit problems.

For your case, you need a dynamic or object array.

var array = new dynamic[counter];

Or

var array = new object[counter];
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