Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Firstly, I've got functions like this.

void func1();
void func2();
void func3();

Then I create my typedef for the array:

void (*FP)();

If I write a normal array of function pointers, it should be something like this:

FP array[3] = {&func1, &func2, &func3};

I want to make it a constant array, using const before "FP", but I've got this error messages:

error: cannot convert 'void ( * )()' to 'void ( * const)()' inialization

PD: Sorry my bad English.

EDIT:

x.h

typedef void (*FP)();

class x
{
 private:
  int number;
  void func1();
  void func2();
  void func3();
  static const FP array[3];
}

x.cpp

const FP x::array[3] = {&x::func1, &x::func2, &x::func3};

My code is more large and complex, this is a summary

share|improve this question
1  
Its always better to write the actual code than saying "Then I create my typedef for the array:" or "using const before "FP"". – sand Feb 4 '10 at 15:14
    
@Facon: You are using a class? Could you post the entire code here? – Jagannath Feb 4 '10 at 15:27
    
I edited the post. – Facon Feb 4 '10 at 15:38
    
Yes, it is correct. BTW, which compiler you are using? – Jagannath Feb 4 '10 at 16:37
2  
Never mind me. As noticed by @Prasoon, the code is wrong. And the error message is also weird. – Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 4 '10 at 17:02
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Then I create my typedef for the array: void (*FP)();

Did you miss typedef before void?

Following works on my compiler.

 void func1(){}
 void func2(){}
 void func3(){}

 typedef void (*FP)();


 int main()
 {
     const FP ar[3]= {&func1, &func2, &func3};
 }

EDIT

(after seeing your edits)

x.h

 class x;
 typedef void (x::*FP)(); // you made a mistake here

 class x
 {
   public:
      void func1();
      void func2();
      void func3();
      static const FP array[3];
 };
share|improve this answer
    
I was using a class..., it takes me the same error using const FP array[3] = ... or using FP const array[3] = ... – Facon Feb 4 '10 at 15:24
    
Show us your entire actual code. – Prasoon Saurav Feb 4 '10 at 15:25
    
I edited the post. – Facon Feb 4 '10 at 15:39
2  
Uhh, you got an good eye, great! Given that his error message said void (*)(), i was thinking myself of static member functions, not checking whether they really are. Now all the question is - did he miss writing static, or did he typo'ed the typedef or/and did he typo'ed the error message? xD – Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 4 '10 at 16:53
1  
Now I've got this error: x.cpp:line: error: must use .* or ->* to call pointer-to-member function in 'x::array[((int)((x*)this)->x::number)] (...)' Calling the array in another x class method. How do you call it? – Facon Feb 4 '10 at 21:22

Which compiler are you using? This works on VS2005.

#include <iostream>

void func1() {std::cout << "func1" << std::endl;}
void func2() {std::cout << "func2" << std::endl;}
void func3() {std::cout << "func3" << std::endl;}

int main()
{
int ret = 0;

typedef void (*FP)();

const FP array[3] = {&func1, &func2, &func3};

return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
g++ of GNU Compiler – Facon Feb 4 '10 at 15:17
    typedef void (*FPTR)();

FPTR const fa[] = { f1, f2};
// fa[1] = f2;  You get compilation error when uncomment this line.
share|improve this answer

without typedef:

void (*const fp[])() = {
    f1,
    f2,
    f3,
};
share|improve this answer

If you want the array itself to be const:

FP const a[] =
    {
        func1,
        func2,
        func3
    };
share|improve this answer
    
Whether he writes FP const or const FP makes no difference. See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1808471/… – Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 4 '10 at 15:41
    
@ltib: While I agree, I'm not sure I see the relevance of your comment. Perhaps you're just observing, in which case, cheers. – John Dibling Feb 4 '10 at 18:28
    
I was just a bit confused, since your answer and the question are basically identical. Just that your's is a non-member array (and that you have the const at another place). So i'm not seeing the relevance of your answer. But maybe you are just observing likewise, so cheers. – Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 7 '10 at 0:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.