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I'm having a small problem with bash shell script on assigning the values from command line to the arrays. For Example if i type $./test.sh aa bb cc i want the values to be assigned to arrays E.g

test[0]=aa
test[1]=bb
test[2]=cc

and it should be limitless, it has to create arrays according to user input.

This is my code

Thank You

#!/usr/bin/bash
count2=1
declare -a mvne $count2
while [ $# -gt $count2 ]
do
mvne[$count2]=$"[$count2]"  <---here is the problem, how do i assign the command line parameter to the array

echo ${mvne[$count2]}
count2=`expr $count2 + 1`
done   
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marked as duplicate by devnull, Малъ Скрылевъ, BMW, Alexander Vogt, wudzik Mar 4 '14 at 7:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The positional parameters are already array-like. You can assign them to another array without looping:

#!/bin/bash
count2=0
declare -a mvne
mvne=( "$@" )
while [ $# -gt $count2 ]
do
    echo $count2: ${mvne[$count2]}
    ((count2++))
done

When run on a command line:

$ bash test.sh aa bb cc
0: aa
1: bb
2: cc
share|improve this answer
    
$@ isn't an array, but it is similar to one. You can't index it, for example (${@[0]} produces an error; use $1 instead). While arrays are absent from the POSIX standard and implemented as an extension by various shells, $@ is a standard special parameter with special expansion behavior when quoted. –  chepner Feb 25 '14 at 12:56
    
@chepner OK, yes, answer updated, but I think the analogy is closer than that: one can think of positional parameters as like-an-array but unnamed. Being unnamed makes the syntax different. Consequently, the analog for $@ is not $name but ${name[@]} just as the analog for $* is ${name[*]} and, allowing for different index-origin conventions, the analog for $1 is ${name[0]}. –  John1024 Feb 25 '14 at 19:09

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