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Is is possible to use jQuery to select an ancestor of an element?

Markup:

<div id="ancestor-1">
    <div>
        <a href="#" class="click-me">Click me</a>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="ancestor-2">
    <div>
        <a href="#" class="click-me">Click me</a>
    </div>
</div>

Script:

$(".click-me").click(function(){
    // var ancestorId = ???;
    alert(ancestorId)
});
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6 Answers 6

Try parent() for the immediate parent element.

$(".click-me").click(function() {
  var ancestor = $(this).parent();
  alert(ancestor)
});

Or parents() for all matching ancestor elements.

$(".click-me").click(function() {
  var ancestors = $(this).parents(".some-ancestor");
  alert(ancestors)
});

Or closest() for the first closest matching element (either an ancestor or self).

$(".click-me").click(function() {
  var ancestor = $(this).closest(".some-ancestor");
  alert(ancestor)
});

The difference between parents() and closest() is subtle but important. closest() will return the current element if it's a match; parents() returns only ancestors. You many not want the possibility of returning the current element. closest() also only returns one element; parents() returns all matching elements.

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You mean something like this?

$('.click-me').click(function() {
    var $theAncestor = $(this).closest('#ancestor-1');
}

This will search through all ancestors until a match is found.

http://api.jquery.com/closest/

EDIT:

Jerome, your question can be interpreted several ways. This speaks to the power and flexibility of jQuery.

Please consider the following.

First, to answer your question, yes, it is possible to use jQuery to select an ancestor of an element.

I think we can assume that you are aware of jQuery's ability to select any element, whether ancestor or descendant via:

$('#myElement')

Given the click-me example, if you would like to have a set of all of an element's ancestors returned, use:

$(this).parents()

or

$(this).parents(selector)

But be aware that this will traverse through ALL ancestors returning all, or all that match when a selector is given.

If you would like to have the immediate parent returned, use:

$(this).parent()

If you know which ancestor you need, use:

$(this).closest(selector)

But be aware that it will only return the first match, and if the current element (this) is a match, it will return that.

I hope this helps.

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2  
The difference between parents() and closest() is subtle but important. closest() will return the current element if it's a match; parents() returns only ancestors. You many not want the possibility of returning the current element. closest() also only returns one element; parents() returns all matching elements. –  Ryan McGeary Feb 4 '10 at 15:28
    
@Ryan - My answer was specific to the question. The question suggests a query for a specific ancestorID, rather than a general query about what the parents are. Given the incrementing nature of the ancestor ids, it seems as though jerome may intend to calculate the ancestor id from the context and request that. –  user113716 Feb 4 '10 at 16:16
    
Patrick, If Jerome intended to calculate the ancestor id from the context, there's absolutely no point in using $(this).closest('#ancestor-1') when $('#ancestor-1') would not only suffice but also be faster. Sometimes, it's better to read into the intentions of a question and direct the answer accordingly. –  Ryan McGeary Feb 5 '10 at 16:55
    
@Ryan - Respectfully, the point is that he appears to be searching for something specific that is expected to be an ancestor. His exact question was "Is is possible to use jQuery to select an ancestor of an element?". Not "Is is possible to use jQuery to return all ancestors?". You said - "Sometimes, it's better to read into the intentions of a question and direct the answer accordingly." And yet your quibble with 'closest()' is that it can return one element including the current element. Reading into Jerome's intention tells us that he is selecting a unique and specific ancestor. –  user113716 Feb 5 '10 at 18:15
    
-1 He wants the closest ancestor’s ID and not the ancestor with a specific ID. –  Gumbo Feb 5 '10 at 18:51

Try using parents() or closest() in combination, perhaps, with a selector to determine which ancestor should match. For example, find the closest ancestor div with an id.

$('.click-me').click( function() {
      var ancestorId = $(this).closest('div[id]');
      alert(ancestorId);
});
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Are you looking for parent()? jQuery Doc for parent selector. If it is different for your scenario explain what is your expected output.

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http://api.jquery.com/parent/ and http://api.jquery.com/parents/

$(".click-me").click(function(){
    var ancestorId = $(this).parent().parent();
    alert(ancestorId)
});

would return the divs with the ids

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It really depends what you want to achieve. Do you want to search for all ancestors regardless of class used? Or do you want to search for all elements that are ancestors and have certain class (ancestor-x in your case)?

If you want to cycle through any ancestors, simply use .parent() (there's an excellent example how to cycle through all elements) or .parents() which can you use like:

$(".click-me").click(function(){
    var parentElements = $(this).parents().map(function () {
        return this.tagName;
    })
    // whatever else you want to do with it
});

Probably the best approach would be to use .parents() until you get to element with certain id or class. It really depends on what you want to do.

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